Cardiff University

Cardiff University is a world-leading, research excellent, educationally outstanding university, driven by creativity and curiosity, which fulfils its social, cultural and economic obligations to Cardiff, Wales and the world.

The University is recognised in independent government assessments as one of Britain’s leading teaching and research universities and is a member of the Russell Group of the UK’s research intensive universities. Among its academic staff are two Nobel Laureates, including the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for Medicine, University Chancellor Professor Sir Martin Evans.

Founded by Royal Charter in 1883, today the University combines impressive modern facilities and a dynamic approach to teaching and research. The University’s breadth of expertise encompasses: the College of Humanities and Social Sciences; the College of Biomedical and Life Sciences; and the College of Physical Sciences, along with a longstanding commitment to lifelong learning. Cardiff’s three flagship Research Institutes are offering radical new approaches to neurosciences and mental health, cancer stem cells and sustainable places.

We are pleased to partner with The Conversation to share Cardiff’s work, helping to make our discoveries and expertise, whether in science, technology, culture, politics or social affairs, widely accessible to all.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 653 articles

Naughty but nice? Barbara Windsor in 2008 at the launch of a new set of stamps celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Carry On films. Geoff Caddick/PA Archive/PA Images

Carry On film revival? Britain’s already got slapstick politics

Carry On films have been compared to a Leave voter's wet dream. But they were more thoughtful and honest than that.
It can be tempting to point fingers, but people with other priorities aren’t necessarily bad. AAP Image/Darren England

Not everyone cares about climate change, but reproach won’t change their minds

In the end, climate policy didn't swing the federal election, and for those on the losing side it can be tempting to play the blame game. But listening and respect are much better ways to move forward.
A Buddhist monk claiming to be the president of the self-styled ‘Protect Sri Lanka’ organisation argues with police personnel barricading the road leading to the president’s official residence in Colombo. EPA-EFE/M.A.PUSHPA KUMARA

Sri Lanka’s Easter Sunday attacks were meant for international audience, but have local consequences

The bombings have been framed as part of ongoing internal conflict, but Sri Lanka was just the stage for a play that could have been performed anywhere in the world.

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