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Cardiff University

Cardiff University is a world-leading, research excellent, educationally outstanding university, driven by creativity and curiosity, which fulfils its social, cultural and economic obligations to Cardiff, Wales and the world.

The University is recognised in independent government assessments as one of Britain’s leading teaching and research universities and is a member of the Russell Group of the UK’s research intensive universities. Among its academic staff are two Nobel Laureates, including the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for Medicine, University Chancellor Professor Sir Martin Evans.

Founded by Royal Charter in 1883, today the University combines impressive modern facilities and a dynamic approach to teaching and research. The University’s breadth of expertise encompasses: the College of Humanities and Social Sciences; the College of Biomedical and Life Sciences; and the College of Physical Sciences, along with a longstanding commitment to lifelong learning. Cardiff’s three flagship Research Institutes are offering radical new approaches to neurosciences and mental health, cancer stem cells and sustainable places.

We are pleased to partner with The Conversation to share Cardiff’s work, helping to make our discoveries and expertise, whether in science, technology, culture, politics or social affairs, widely accessible to all.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 731 articles

A protester makes his views about the prime minister’s advisor clear outside Downing Street, May 2020. Yui Mok/PA Wire/PA Images

People have been switching off from coronavirus news – but the Dominic Cummings story cut through

COVID-19 'news fatigue' had set in with the UK public, but then the prime minister's chief advisor changed all that.
UK opposition leader, Keir Starmer, with a government graph showing an international comparison of COVID-19 death tolls. UK Parliament/Jessica Taylor/PA Wire/PA Images

Coronavirus: public confused and suspicious over government’s death toll information

Most people believe the government was wrong to stop publishing international comparisons of COVID-19 death tolls.
The UK’s chief medical officer Chris Whitty and prime minister Boris Johnson taking questions from BBC journalist Laura Kuenssberg at the end of March. 10 Downing Street / Crown copyright / Andrew Parsons/PA Wire/PA Images

People trust TV journalists and want them to scrutinise government coronavirus policy — new research

Calls for journalists to rally round the UK government's efforts to fight the pandemic are out of touch with public opinion, an in-depth study of news audiences has found.

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