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Articles on Trump trials

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Former President Donald Trump walks out of a Manhattan courthouse after he was found guilty in his hush money trial on May 30, 2024. Seth Wenig-Pool/Getty Images

Trump’s criminal conviction won’t stop him from getting security clearance as president − but Biden can still control his access for now

Under normal circumstances, Trump’s criminal record and other aspects of his life, including financial history, would disqualify him from getting access to classified information.
Donald Trump arrives in a Manhattan court to hear the jury’s verdict. Justin Lane-Pool/Getty Images

Trump’s guilty verdict is not the end of the matter

By focusing on the facts, the public can avoid being distracted by baseless allegations about the Trump verdict that undermine institutions designed to ensure – not weaponize – justice.
Donald Trump speaks to the media after his conviction on 34 felony charges on May 30, 2024. Steven Hirsch/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Trump’s prosecution is unprecedented in US – but other countries have prosecuted former leaders

Both sweeping immunity and overzealous prosecutions of former leaders can undermine democracy. But such prosecutions pose different risks for older democracies like the US than in younger ones.
Michael Cohen leaves his home to attend his second day of testimony at Manhattan Criminal Court on May 14, 2024, in New York City. David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

A silent Trump with eyes closed and a convicted liar on the stand − 2 experienced observers of Trump’s criminal trial discuss what stands out

Lying liars and closed eyes − both played roles in the most recent chapter of former President Donald Trump’s criminal trial in New York City.
Donald Trump sits in a New York courtroom with Chris Kise and Alina Habba, two of his attorneys who have reportedly been paid with political action committee funds. Shannon Stapleton-Pool/Getty Images

Yes, Trump’s PACs really can pay his legal fees

Trump-aligned political action committees have paid lawyers for the former president tens of millions of dollars. Are there any limits on how much, or on what, they can spend?
E. Jean Carroll arrives for the first day of her civil trial against former President Donald Trump on April 25, 2023. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Trump found liable for assaulting, defaming E. Jean Carroll – after a trial where he relied on a discredited myth about how women should react to rape

Trump’s lawyers questioned E. Jean Carroll, a magazine columnist, about why she did not scream or call the police after, she alleged, Trump sexually assaulted her in the 1990s.
Donald Trump appears in court in New York City, in a courtroom sketch by Jane Rosenberg. Jane Rosenberg/Reuters

Donald Trump and the dying art of the courtroom sketch

Whereas ‘the camera sees everything, but captures nothing,’ courtroom artists can channel the emotional highs and lows of a trial through a single image.

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