Articles on Tuition-free college

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Americans support free community college more when students are seen as ‘deserving,’ new research suggests. Klaus Vedfelt/Getty Images

What Americans think about who deserves tuition-free college

As tuition-free college plans gain momentum, a researcher examines public views about whether free college should be extended to everyone or just those who have earned it.
West Texas A&M University Walter V. Wendler stands alongside the SUV he drove on a speaking tour to urge Texas high school students not to borrow too much for college.

A college president’s advice to college students of the future: Don’t borrow

West Texas A&M University President Walter Wendler set out to visit high school students throughout the Texas Panhandle and the South Plains with a simple message about student loans.
Washington state has passed a measure to cover college tuition for students from low- and moderate-income families. VDB Photos/Shutterstock.com

Washington state’s big bet on ‘free college’

A new law in Washington state that makes college mostly free for many students is meant to prepare more residents from the state for jobs in the local economy. Whether it will work remains to be seen.
Researchers found that families who send their children off to college face an increased risk for foreclosure. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

Thinking about borrowing against your home to send your kids to college? Think again

The odds of foreclosure double for families who send their kids off to college, according to two researchers who say their findings show a need for new ways for Americans pay for higher education.
Has the cost of higher education in the U.S. put college out of financial reach? DRogatnev/www.shutterstock.com

Making college more affordable

As students head back to campus, the ever higher cost of a college education is once again top of mind. The presidents of Colorado College, Penn State and Xavier University weigh in on what's to be done.
Has student debt changed because the purpose of education has changed? John Collier/Library of Congress, Ermolaev Alexander/Shutterstock.com

From public good to personal pursuit: Historical roots of the student debt crisis

About 44 million Americans are still paying off student loan debt. But it didn't always used to be this way. As the perceived purpose of a college education changed, so too did the way we pay for it.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo recently announced a proposal for free tuition at state colleges. AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Free college explained in a global context

What does tuition-free college mean in other parts of the world? And what would it mean for international students?
Hillary Clinton takes questions during a student town hall at a campaign stop at New England College in Henniker, New Hampshire. Adrees Latif/Reuter

Why debt-free college will not solve the real problems in America’s higher education system

America's higher education has been split into two unequal worlds. Schools serving the bulk of America's underprivileged students lack resources. Making college free will not solve the problem.

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