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Articles on US education

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Schools that build trust with their communities can reduce fears surrounding reopening. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Building trust among parents and teachers is key to reopening schools

With distrust for school officials prevalent during the pandemic, an educational historian calls attention to the need for officials to have more positive relations with educators and parents.
Teacher activism in the U.S. has helped pushed the Democratic party towards renewed investment in public education. Children listen as former president Barack Obama campaigns for Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden, Oct. 21, 2020, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/ Matt Slocum)

How teachers’ union activism helped shift the U.S. election debate on education

The push to expand charter schools in the U.S. contributed to a robust movement of teachers’ unions and allies demanding a well-resourced public school system.
A Guatemalan immigrant tries to log on to his Chromebook while remote learning in Stamford, Connecticut. John Moore/Getty Images

For many immigrant students, remote learning during COVID-19 comes with more hurdles

Immigrant students often have work commitments outside class, and they may need additional language support. Giving them equal access to technology during remote learning might not be enough.
Big education tests come with serious side effects, research shows. YanLev/Shutterstock.com

Large-scale education tests often come with side effects

While large-scale education assessments, such as the PISA, are meant to show how education systems are faring around the world, evidence shows these assessments come with a host of problems.
A 1974 Supreme Court decision found that school segregation was allowable if it wasn’t being done on purpose. AP

The Supreme Court decision that kept suburban schools segregated

When the Supreme Court exempted suburbs in the North from the kind of desegregation orders imposed in the South, it enabled the 'de facto' segregation that continues in America's schools to this day.
Research is mixed about whether children lose learning during summer break. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

5 things parents need to know about ‘summer loss’

While many studies and news articles say children lose academically over the summer break, a researcher says the worries are exaggerated.
Thurgood Marshall outside the Supreme Court in Washington in 1958. Marshall, the head of the NAACP’s legal arm who argued part of the case, went on to become the Supreme Court’s first African-American justice. AP

The Brown v. Board of Education case didn’t start how you think it did

While the Brown vs. Board of Education case is often celebrated for ordering school desegregation, history shows many black people in the city where the case began opposed integrated schools.
Students listen to their teacher, Shuma Das, at the Sahabatpur Daspara Ananda school in Sahabatpur village, Bangladesh in 2016. Dominic Chavez/World Bank

What other countries can teach the US about raising teacher pay

Research from around the world shows that boosting teacher pay can lead to better student learning, but only if it's accompanied by other things.
Students leave Columbine High School late April 16, 2019, in Littleton, Colo., following a lockdown at the school and other Denver area schools. David Zalubowski/AP

How Columbine became a blueprint for school shooters

Media coverage of the Columbine school shooting that took place in 1999 has ended up becoming a playbook for school shooters in the United States and beyond, an analysis of school shootings reveals.
Teachers rally outside the Arizona Capitol in April 2018 during a strike over low salaries. Matt York/AP

Are America’s teachers really underpaid?

A presidential candidate wants to use federal funds to boost teacher pay. Is the proposal justified or is it just pandering to teacher unions to get votes? An education scholar provides perspective.

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