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Articles on Wet'suwet'en

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An RCMP officer looks on as supporters of the Wet'suwet'en Nation block a road outside of RCMP headquarters in Surrey, B.C., in January 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Provincial governments are setting the stage for more violence against Indigenous Peoples and their lands

The passage of laws in Alberta and Saskatchewan granting police greater powers and weapons are seen as a direct attempt to stifle protests by Indigenous Peoples.
A newly built power generation plant is seen near Huexca, Mexico, in February 2020. The power plant is part of a mega-energy project that includes a natural gas pipeline that traverses three states. AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo

TC Energy’s name change: Rebooting Canadian pipeline empires

The behaviour of TC Energy, the company formerly known as TransCanada, in Wet'suwet'en resulted in a nationwide crisis in Canada. It should not be repeated in Mexico.
A man carries an eagle feather as police prepare to enforce an injunction against protesters who were blocking a road used to access to the Port of Vancouver during a demonstration in support of Wet'suwet'en Nation hereditary chiefs on Feb. 25, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Indigenous civil rights blockades should be met with a new diplomacy, not violence

Canada is at a critical crossroads. The Wet’suwet’en conflict brings us to a deciding moment in Canada, one that will shape the future of the nation.
A butterfly and medicine garden planted by ‘Finding Flowers’ at Maloca Community Garden, York University, Toronto. (Dana Prieto)

How Wet’suwet’en butterflies offer lessons in resilience and resistance

Indigenous land stewardship, resource extraction and corporate interests remain critical issues to addressing large-scale environmental concerns such as pollinator loss in Canada and beyond.
Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs from left, Rob Alfred, John Ridsdale and Antoinette Austin, take part in a rally in Smithers, B.C., in January 2020 against the Coastal GasLink project. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Coastal GasLink pipeline dispute is a nation-to-nation matter

Reconciliation cannot be achieved by the brute force of the RCMP or the self-interests of energy companies.
Supporters of the Unist'ot'en camp and Wet'suwet'en walk along a bridge over the Wedzin kwa River leading towards the main camp outside Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Unist’ot’en and the limits of reconciliation in Canada

It's time to engage with Indigenous people through the governance systems built prior to European settlement.
Alexander Joseph from the Babine Lake First Nation joins supporters of the Unist'ot'en camp and Wet'suwet'en First Nation as they gather at a camp fire off a logging road near Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Corporations don’t seem to understand Indigenous jurisdiction

TransCanada Corporation has misunderstood or misrepresented the risks associated with Indigenous jurisdiction.

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