Articles on Biomechanics

Displaying 1 - 20 of 37 articles

How do they do while sleeping what we can barely do at all? Carlos Bustamante Restrepo

Neuromechanics of flamingos’ amazing feats of balance

These birds spend long periods, often asleep, standing on one leg. Is it passive biomechanics or active nervous system control of their muscles that allows them to do easily what's impossible for us?
Springy soles, stiffer shoes, lightweight materials. When does shoe design give some runners an unfair advantage? from www.shutterstock.com

Beware the hype – springy soles won’t make you run much faster

Running shoes with springs in the soles have been touted as the next big thing in shoe design. But they won't turn a weekend warrior into an Olympian.
Gotcha, five times faster than the blink of an eye. Candler Hobbs/Georgia Tech

The frog tongue is a high-speed adhesive

How do a frog's tongue and saliva work together to be sticky enough to lift 1.4 times the animal's body weight? Painstaking lab work found their spit switches between two distinct phases to nab prey.
Usain Bolt surprisingly synchronised his steps with Tyson Gay (left) when he broke the world record at the 12th IAAF World Championships in Athletics in 2009. AAP/Christophe Karaba

The secret to Usain Bolt’s speed may lie in synchronicity

Synchronising his steps with the next fastest runner may have helped Usain Bolt win the world record in the 100 metre sprint.
Record breaking. EPA/Christophe Karaba

Can a human ever run 100m under nine seconds?

It is never easy to run 100m in less than ten seconds, as the recent Commonwealth Games demonstrated. However, as the world record stands at 9.58 seconds, the attention in recent years has turned to whether…
Javelin throwers make it look easy, but there’s more to the action than you might think. David Davies/PA Wire

Science of the spear: biomechanics of a javelin throw

The Commonwealth Games women’s javelin finals were held overnight, with Aussies Kim Mickle and Kelsey-Lee Roberts picking up gold (plus a Games record) and bronze respectively. Seven-time British champion…
Cyclists in the Monash Wind Tunnel are able to measure the effects of their gear on wind resistance. Monash University

The aerodynamics of a Tour de France time trial

As the Tour de France approaches its final days, teams will be looking to place their top riders in the best possible position for the all-important individual time trial in the penultimate stage, where…
Australia’s Cate Campbell transitioning from the on-block phase to the flight phase of a swimming start. EPA/Juanjo Martin

Take your marks … the science behind the perfect swimming dive

The swimming events of the Glasgow Commonwealth Games are among the first on the schedule. Australia and the UK tend to do quite well in the swimming events – as does Canada – so it’s an excellent opportunity…
Nick Kyrgios’ blistering serve has attracted the attention of tennis fans around the world. AAP/Julian Smith

Smashing success: the science behind Kyrgios’ serve

A big serve proved its value as part of Australian wild card Nick Kyrgios’ game yesterday, with 37 aces in his fourth round Wimbledon victory over world number one Rafael Nadal. Kyrgios, the first player…

Top contributors

More