Articles on Charles Darwin

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Angustoniscus amieuensis, a New Caledonian cockroach that lives in the moist forests of the island. P.Grandcolas

How a humble cockroach rewrote the history of New Caledonia

The theory that New Caledonia was a piece of land that separated from the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana was a seductive one. But then a cockroach rose up to challenge it.
Local people at Tendaguru (Tanzania) excavation site in 1909 with Giraffatitan fossils. Wikimedia Commons/Public domain

It’s time to celebrate Africa’s forgotten fossil hunters

Africa has one of the world's richest fossil records, and evidence suggests that amateurs collected really important fossils long before professionals arrived on the scene.
House Speaker Paul Ryan announced March 24 that he was pulling his proposed health care bill from consideration. Scott Applewhite/AP

Did medical Darwinism doom the GOP health plan?

The U.S. has been arguing about health care for decades. Critics have argued that insurance for all is a sign of weakness or even Communist. Here's a look at how the thinking has evolved -- or not.
People have camped in the long grass since colonisation. From this perspective, bans on the practice are a denial of Indigenous agency, culture and rights to country. Photo: K. Pollard

Contested spaces: the ‘long-grassers’, living private lives in public places

In contrast to perceptions of other homeless people sleeping rough, Darwin's "long-grassers" are applying a long cultural tradition to deal with the situation in which they find themselves.
In Darwin the wet season usually arrives around Christmas Day. Storm image from www.shutterstock.com

Explainer: what is the Australian monsoon?

The Australian monsoon delivers most of northern Australia's rainfall and is a vital feature of life in the region. But why does it occur?
A wax figure of Charles Darwin, whose theories about species have influenced science for centuries. Jose Manuel Ribeiro/Reuters

The long struggle to understand species: from pre-Darwin to the present day

Humans have an innate interest and ability in naming biologically meaningful entities, or species. Taxonomy, then, vies for the title of world's “oldest profession”.
Graduates of a 2015 Tertiary Entry Program, which paves the way into university courses, with lead author and CQUniversity’s Pro Vice-Chancellor of Indigenous Engagement, Bronwyn Fredericks (fourth from left) and Provost Hilary Winchester (far right). Peter Lawrence/CQUniNewsPICs

Laying pathways for greater success in education for Indigenous Australians

If we're serious about closing the gap in Indigenous education, our new research shows the value of building better bridges into universities and vocational education.
View of Port Jackson, Fort Macquarie and part of Sydney Cove, in 1836. Govett, William Romaine/National Library

Charles Darwin’s evolutionary revelation in Australia

Charles Darwin visited Australia 180 years ago, and while here, he had a revelation that helped spark his insight into evolution by natural selection.

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