Articles on Heart disease

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A mix of fats, such as those found in nuts, avocados, salmon and olives, could be healthy and more satisfying. Craevschii Family/Shutterstock.com

Let them eat more fat? Researcher argues that a balance of types of fat is the key

When did eating become so confusing? In the 1960s, studies began to show a link between heart disease and dietary fat, and fat was demonized. As it turns out, fat is nuanced and may not be so bad.
You’re another year older but that doesn’t have to mean poorer health. Lorene Farrugia

Diseases through the decades – here’s what to look out for in your 40s, 60s, 80s and beyond

As you age, your body deteriorates and your risk of disease and injury increases. Here's a decade by decade guide to what you're up against – and what you can do about it.
Heart attacks increase with lower air temperature, lower atmospheric air pressure, higher wind velocity, shorter sunshine duration and colder weather. from shutterstock.com

Heart attacks more frequent in colder weather

Doctors have long acknowledged heart attacks are more likely to occur in cold weather. But now a major study has confirmed it.
A nurse in Uganda uses a stethoscope to listen for heart problems at a screening and educational event Oct. 31, 2017. Tao Farren-Hefer

Women with heart disease in sub-Saharan Africa face challenges, but stigma may be worst of all

Noncommunicable diseases are a growing problem in Africa. Among women, heart disease is a particular concern. Medication to treat it can interfere with pregnancy, making women undesirable partners.
For decades, doctors have been prescribing low-dose aspirin for healthy people over the age of 70. from shutterstock.com

Daily low-dose aspirin doesn’t reduce heart-attack risk in healthy people

Taking low-dose aspirin daily doesn't delay the onset of disability in healthy older people. Nor does it prevent heart attack or stroke in those who hadn't experienced either condition before.
Women who have had a heart attack are less likely to be given an angiogram (a special X-ray to detect blockages of the heart), rehabilitation, or medication than men. Shutterstock/Syda Productions

Women who have heart attacks receive poorer care than men

New research shows women receive sub-optimal care after they have a heart attack and are twice as likely than men to die six months after the attack.

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