Articles on Exercise

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Clinical research has established exercise as a safe and effective intervention to counteract the adverse physical and psychological effects of cancer and its treatment. The Clinical Oncology Society of Australia is the first to recommend exercise as part of regular cancer care. (Unsplash/curtis macnewton)

Exercise is medicine, and doctors are starting to prescribe it

From weekend walks with your doctor to free gym memberships, there is a global movement afoot.
Antidepressants bring in almost $17 billion a year for the pharmaceutical industry, and yet science shows their benefit to be small. Natural therapies such as diet, exercise, light therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy are just as effective. (Shutterstock)

Why natural depression therapies are better than pills

These four “natural” therapies for depression have rigorous, peer-reviewed scientific studies to support their use.
Getting enough physical activity can be challenging for women and girls, because they have to negotiate complex gender roles, stereotypes and cultural narratives about the body. (Shutterstock)

Girls and women need more time in nature to be healthy

Women and adolescent girls say that being outdoors in nature offers opportunities to gain confidence in physical activity.
Yoga, meditation and breathing exercises can help students manage exam anxiety. www.shutterstock.com

How to beat exam stress

The exam period can be a stressful time for students. Here are a few strategies to help students cope.
Perfectionists are rarely satisfied with their performance or appearance and engage in harsh self-criticism when their efforts fall short. Perfectionists are also more likely to develop the eating disorder bulimia nervosa, according to new research. (Shutterstock)

Perfectionists more likely to develop bulimia: New research

Perfectionists have a higher chance of developing bulimia nervosa. Rather than treating symptoms of binge eating and vomiting, therapists should address this underlying personality trait.
Being thin doesn’t mean you can eat unhealthy foods and get away with it. from www.shutterstock.com

Just because you’re thin, doesn’t mean you’re healthy

You might be thin on the outside, but if you have a poor diet and are physically inactive, you can have the same health risks as someone who is obese.
Many athletes stretch before and after exercise, but they may not be gaining benefits from doing so. ESB Basic/shutterstock.com

Why stretching is (still) important for weight loss and exercise

Who hasn't been told to stretch before and after exercise to prevent injury and improve performance? There may be no scientific evidence to back that up, although stretching has other benefits.
Sitting can do more than give you a headache. It is linked to diabetes and obesity. Stockfour/Shutterstock.com

Sitting and diabetes in older adults: Does timing matter?

Researchers are learning even more about how a sedentary lifestyle is bad for our bodies. A recent study shows a link between sitting patterns and diabetes in older people.

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