Articles on Inequality

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When school gets tough, do you think it’s worthwhile? Or time to give up? Pavlin Plamenov Petkov/Shutterstock.com

Do challenges make school seem impossible or worthwhile?

A high school science test, a Psych 101 course, long job applications: Sometimes it's hard to be motivated to succeed. As it turns out, how you respond to difficulty and ease can make all the difference.
Members of Patriotic Millionaires, whose privileged members advocate for higher taxes on the rich, met with lawmakers in this 2015 photo to discuss legislation to close the carried interest loophole. Senate Democrats

How some rich people are trying to dismantle inequality

When the wealthy become unlikely allies in the fight against inequality, they often take similar steps. It all starts with acknowledging their own privileges.
Protests escalate as corruption and public sector incompetence in South Africa hamper the provision of basic services. EPA/Kim Ludbrook

How corruption is fraying South Africa’s social and economic fabric

The political cost of corruption is reaching unacceptable levels in South Africa. Reversing the effects of state decay on the poor will take short and long term interventions.
Debbie Ziegler, mother of the late Brittany Maynard, in Sacramento in September 2015, encouraging the passage of California’s End-of-Life Options Act. Maynard, who had brain cancer, had to move to Oregon so she could end her life legally in 2014. AP Photo/Carl Costas

Death as a social privilege? How aid-in-dying laws may be revealing a new health care divide

People who seek aid in dying tend to be white men older than 65, a new analysis shows. While this could be due to religious views, here's why it could also be because of lack of access.
Abandoned industrial buildings at San Francisco’s Pier 70, with a smokestack in the background. Lindsey Dillon

Cleaning up toxic sites shouldn’t clear out the neighbors

Cleaning up and reusing contaminated sites, known as brownfields, can create jobs and promote economic growth. But it also can drive gentrification that prices out low-income residents.
People have always asked for alms, including the men depicted in this 17th-century European etching. Wenceslaus Hollar/The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Give and take: Credentials could aid panhandling

The courts are saying that down-and-out Americans have a right to seek curbside alms despite efforts to ban the practice. Two scholars have come up with an alternative to anti-panhandling ordinances.
The region with the most unequal incomes in Australia is Melbourne City, where the top 20% have an income that is 8.3 times as high as those in the bottom 20%. Dan Peled/AAP

What income inequality looks like across Australia

Census data shows there is income inequality between, but also within, regions of Australia.
The highest incidence rates by state for the major cancers for men and women are in Queensland. AAP Image/Julian Smith

New maps reveal cancer levels across Australia, and across the social strata

Public health experts traditionally expect that the poorer you are, the more likely you are to be unwell and die before your time. But newly available data on cancer rates show that's not always true.
A homeless camp in Los Angeles, where homelessness has risen 23 percent in the past year, in May 2017. AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Why poverty is not a personal choice, but a reflection of society

Americans, an independent group, tend to believe that people can "pull themselves up by their boot straps." Yet bigger forces are at play in a person's ability to gain education, a good job and money.
Oak Grove Acapella Singers, a Gospel group of Chester County, Tennessee, being recorded while singing in the office of the preacher at the Oak Grove Church of Christ. Tennessee State Library and Archives

When gospel sermons came on the phonograph

As the African-American Music Appreciation Month comes to a close, a scholar discusses the role of early preachers in shaping gospel music.
The sun rises behind the remains of a New Jersey roller coaster destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. AP Photo/Mel Evans

New data set explores 90 years of natural disasters in the US

As the rich move away from disaster-prone areas, the poor may be left behind.
In El Salvador, the dead are almost innumerable, but not forgotten. Jose Cabezas/Reuters

How to fix Latin America’s homicide problem

Latin America's murder rate is the highest in the world, accounting for one in every four homicides on the planet.

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