Articles on Marine biology

Displaying 1 - 20 of 46 articles

Steven Morgan deploys ABLE robots in a swimming pool to test how well their programs simulate larval behavior. University of California, Davis

Underwater robots help scientists see where marine larvae go and how they get there

Most ocean species start out as larvae drifting with currents. Using underwater robots, scientists have found that larvae use swimming motions to affect their course and reach suitable places to grow.
Cartier Island marine reserve is part of a network that covers one-third of Australian waters. Australian Institute of Marine Science

Oil, gas and marine parks really can coexist in our oceans – here’s how

Marine parks need to cover large swathes of ocean, but they also need to cover the right areas if they are to deliver the best conservation. New research off Australia's northwest suggests how.
A study has shown that turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper digging out of the sand to save energy. Banco de Imagem Projeto Tamar/Flickr

Turtle hatchlings lend each other a flipper to save energy

New research suggests turtle hatchlings work together with clutch mates to escape their underground nests.
Tuna and other top predators could run out of food in warming seas. Tuna image from

The oceans are changing too fast for marine life to keep up

Over the past five years we've seen a significant increase in research on ocean acidification and warming seas, and their effect on marine life. Overall, unfortunately, the news is not good.
A green turtle hatches in the lab. David Pike

Rising seas could drown turtle eggs: new research

Immersion in seawater kills sea turtle eggs, suggesting that sea turtles are increasingly at risk from rising seas, according to research published today in Royal Society Open Science.

Top contributors