Articles on Oceans

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Indonesia announced ‘war against marine plastic debris’ in 2016 as a recent study dubbed the country as the second largest waste producer in the world. www.shutterstock.com

Indonesia needs more research on how plastic waste in the ocean impact marine life. Here’s why

Indonesia is struggling to keep its waste from the oceans. The government has announced ambitious plan to curb plastic waste. However, lack of research to support the policy.
The remotely operated vehicle Deep Discoverer captures images of a newly discovered hydrothermal vent field in the western Pacific. NOAA

Curious Kids: How deep is the ocean?

In some places, the ocean is almost 7 miles deep. Scientists exploring the ocean floor have found strange sea creatures, bizarre geologic formations and records of Earth's history.
During the Pliocene, up to one third of Antarctica’s ice sheet melted, causing sea-level rise of 20 metres. from www.shutterstock.com

If warming exceeds 2°C, Antarctica’s melting ice sheets could raise seas 20 metres in coming centuries

New research shows that warming by more than 2°C could be a tipping point for Antarctica's ice sheets, resulting in widespread meltdown and changes to the world's shorelines for centuries to come.
Blue whales and orcas are both specialists in their own way. You can’t really measure which one is more intelligent. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: which is smarter – a blue whale or an orca?

We don't know for sure which one is smarter, because not everyone agrees on what "intelligence" means. Both have their own special behaviours and skills and we can't say who is more intelligent.
Greenland’s ice sheet suffered major melting in July 2019, dumping billions of tons of meltwater into the Atlantic Ocena. Jennifer Latuperisa-Andresen/Unsplash

IPCC report paints catastrophic picture of melting ice and rising sea levels – and reality may be even worse

The UN body responsible for communicating the science of climate breakdown has released its long-awaited report on how we're changing our ice and oceans. In a nutshell, the news isn't good.
Drift ice forming in the Baltic Sea, where microplastic concentrations are at levels similar to those in the Arctic. The incorporation of microplastics into sea ice affects how well the ice absorbs or reflects solar energy. Shutterstock

Microplastics may affect how Arctic sea ice forms and melts

Levels of microplastics in the ocean are rising. More study is needed to figure out how these microplastics affect the qualities and properties of sea ice, and what the potential impact may be.
Larval black sea bass, an important commercial species along the US Atlantic coast. NOAA Fisheries/Ehren Habeck

Fish larvae float across national borders, binding the world’s oceans in a single network

Fish can't read maps, and their eggs and larvae drift across national boundaries. Recent research shows that local problems in one fishery can affect others across wide areas.
An Atlantic cod on ice. Cod fisheries in the North Sea and Irish Sea are declining due to overfishing and climate change. Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Ocean warming has fisheries on the move, helping some but hurting more

As the oceans warm, fish are moving to stay in temperature zones where they have evolved to live. This is helping some species, hurting others and causing a net reduction in potential catch.
It’s OK, I’m a filter feeder: Whale shark off Indonesia. Marcel Ekkel/Flickr

Shark Week looms, but don’t panic

Media coverage of sharks often exaggerates risks to people, but more than 500 shark species have never been known to attack humans, and there's lots to learn about them.
Researchers pour a barrel of hagfish into a holding tank aboard a research vessel about 20 miles off the coast of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. AP/Steven Senne

Curious Kids: What in the world is a slime eel?

Hagfish have been called the most disgusting creatures in the ocean. But what are they?

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