Articles on Fisheries

Displaying 1 - 20 of 84 articles

Globalised fishing can leave workers vulnerable to exploitation. Shutterstock.com

How to keep slave-caught seafood off your plate

A lack of sustainability, profitability and transparency in the global fishing industry is exacerbating the problem of slave-like working conditions for crew. Here are the warning signs to look out for.
When a stream enters a culvert, the flow can be concentrated so much that water flows incredibly fast. So fast, in fact, that small and juvenile fish are unable to swim against the flow and are prevented from reaching where they need to go to eat, reproduce or find safety. Shutterstock

How did the fish cross the road? Our invention helps them get to the other side of a culvert

Our new invention tackles one of the greatest impediments to fish migration in Australia: culverts, those tunnels or drains often found under roads.
Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (NOAA Photo Library/flickr)

New fishing rules aim to protect Gulf of St. Lawrence right whales

After 17 North Atlantic right whales were killed or caught in fishing gear in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence in 2017, the Canadian government set new rules for the snow crab and lobster fisheries.
The captain of a Finnish icebreaker looks out from the bridge as it sails into floating sea ice on the Victoria Strait while traversing the Northwest Passage in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago in July 2017. The waterways of the Arctic are of particular interest to non-Arctic jurisdictions like China and the European Union. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

Why the Arctic isn’t a ‘global commons’

The recent Arctic Council meeting in Finland shows there's still avid interest in developing the Arctic. Some are arguing the entire region should be considered a 'global commons.'
Farmed fish like these carp now make an important contribution to global food security. Ben Belton

Let them eat carp: Fish farms are helping to fight hunger

Many critics say that fish farms mainly sell their output to wealthy countries and don't provide much benefit to poor people in producing countries. Three aquaculture experts show why this view is wrong.
Healthy aquatic vegetation in the Chesapeake Bay. Cassie Gurbisz/University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Cutting pollution in the Chesapeake Bay has helped underwater grasses rebound

An ambitious plan to cut the flow of nutrients into the Chesapeake Bay has produced historic regrowth of underwater seagrasses. These results offer hope for other polluted water bodies.
Villagers enjoying the evening fishing in Kavieng, Papua New Guinea. (Colette Wabnitz)

Less money, more problems – trying to get fisheries right

Sustainable fisheries tick all the boxes. They can fill your belly and your wallet, and generate less CO2 than conventional agriculture. So why is some integral funding for marine fisheries falling?
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his wife Sophie Grégoire Trudeau kayak in the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

What Trudeau needs to do to become Canada’s first ‘Oceans Prime Minister’

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has taken swift action on protecting marine areas over the past two years, but he'll need to continue this momentum if he is to cement his legacy.

Top contributors

More