Articles on Opioid crisis

Displaying 1 - 20 of 34 articles

Cannabis seedlings are shown at the new Aurora Cannabis facility, November 24, 2017 in Montréal. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Hope for cannabis as treatment for opioid addiction

Research shows that THC and CBD in cannabis have potential to interrupt the vicious cycle of opioid addiction, dependence, withdrawal and relapse.
Few medical schools offer training in addictions medicine and most doctors feel they lack the specialist expertise to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

How the opioid crisis is disrupting hospital care

Canadian hospitals are ill-equipped to deal with the inpatient opioid crisis. Lack of specialist addictions care puts patients and staff at risk.
A few woefully underfunded academic health sciences centres are responsible for providing complex care to patients with life-threatening illnesses as well as training future doctors and testing the latest in new surgical techniques. (Shutterstock)

Why we need academic health science centres

Canada's systems of health funding, medical training and physician compensation need an overhaul – to support vital centres of medical research and complex care.
U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams demonstrates the proper procedure for administering a nasal injection of naloxone on reporter Jennifer Lott, left, during a visit to the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson, Miss., May 17, 2018. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Naloxone remains controversial to some, but here’s why it shouldn’t be

One study argues that naloxone increases opioid use because it protects against death from overdose. But a closer analysis shows Narcan is the number one public health tool to fight the overdose epidemic.
As doctors have learned more about the types of pain, they can better tailor treatment. Dundanim/Shutterstock.com

A way around opioids: Target the type of pain for better pain relief

As knowledge of pain and the highly addictive nature of opioids has grown, so has the knowledge grown about pain and its origins. A pain specialist explains the intricacies, and how treatment is changing as a result.
Paramedics and firefighters in Cincinnati respond to a possible opioid overdose at a hotel on Nov. 2, 2017. John Minchillo/AP Photo

Suicide nation: What’s behind the need to numb and to seek a final escape?

Deaths from opioid overdose and suicide are at an all-time high. One in 10 adult Americans uses marijuana. And only 1 in 3 Americans self-describes as 'happy.' A public health expert asks, what's going on?
‘Confessions of an English Opium-Eater’ was the first modern drug memoir and set the tone for opium use for decades. Here: Papaver somniferum (Opium poppy), a group of deep red flowers, buds and seed pods. Opium is extracted from the latex of the unripe seed pods. Ripe seeds are innocuous and widely used in baking. (Rowan McOnegal/Wellcome Collection)

The 19th century book that spawned the opioid crisis

'Confessions of an English Opium-Eater' is considered the first modern drug memoir. Many believe it is responsible for our romantic ideas of opium-based drug use today.
Naloxone is often used to revive people overdosing from opioids. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Why genetics makes some people more vulnerable to opioid addiction – and protects others

Scientists are just starting to understand how your parents' genes and experiences might shape your own susceptibility to dangerous drugs. Could that help to stop addictions before they start?
Pain lets us know when there is something wrong, but sometimes our brains can trick us. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain. The Conversation58.7 MB (download)
Our podcast Trust Me, I'm An Expert, goes beyond the headlines and asks researchers to explain the evidence on issues making news. Today, we're talking pain and what science says about managing it.
When should you ask your doctor for opioids? Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

Is it wrong to ask your doctor for opioids?

A scholar explains why there is no one answer. Some pain is devastating, and sometimes such pain responds well to opioids. On the other hand, there is evidence that some physicians overprescribe.
Needles used for shooting heroin and other opioids litter the ground of a Philadelphia park. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller

Scaling back Obamacare will make the opioid crisis worse

By undermining the ACA, Republicans may be taking away one of the health care system's best tools for improving the lives of those with addiction.

Top contributors

More