Articles on Quebec

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Battle of St. Eustache, December 14,1837: Rear view of St. Eustache church and scattering of insurgents during the 1837 rebellion in Saint-Eustache, a city in Québec. Ink and watercolor on paper. Lord Charles Beauclerk/Library Archives of Canada

Montreal’s mysterious monument: Whose past do we commemorate?

Why is a memorial to 29 Francophone men who were executed by the British government as well as to 58 men who were exiled to Australia in 1838 hidden away in a Montreal cemetery?
Jean Chretien, then Canada’s attorney general, signs the proclamation repatriating Canada’s constitution while Queen Elizabeth II watches in Ottawa in April 1982. The Constitution includes Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the notwithstanding clause that allows provinces to opt out of adhering to the Charter. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ron Poling

The sparse use of Canada’s notwithstanding clause

The notwithstanding clause in Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms has seldom been used. But it's not totally gathering dust, and Quebec is hinting it might use it to defend its niqab law.
Warda Naili poses for a photograph at a park in Montreal in October. Naili, a convert to Islam, said she decided to cover her face out of a desire to practise her faith more authentically and to protect her modesty. Bill 62 forces women to remove their niqabs while using public services. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

The link between Quebec’s niqab law and its sovereignty quest

Bill 62 is likely to trigger even tenser controversies on Quebecois identity before next year's provincial election. A historical perspective helps us understand the connection to Quebec sovereignty.
Métis Family and a Red River Cart, 1883. (State Historical Society of North Dakota, A4365)

Becoming Indigenous: The rise of Eastern Métis in Canada

New census data sheds light on the country's Indigenous population. In Eastern Canada, the rise in people claiming to be “Métis” is a controversial case of "settler self-indigenization."
Warda Naili poses for a photograph on a city bus in Montreal. Last week, Bill 62 was passed in Quebec, outlawing the wearing of a niqab on public transit. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Quebec’s niqab ban uses women’s bodies to bolster right-wing extremism

Bill 62, a bill passed last week banning the wearing of Niqab in Québec for those seeking access to public services, is widely seen as an attack on Muslim women. Why is it even necessary?
Jagmeet Singh won 53.6 per cent of the first-ballot votes on Sunday to become the new leader of Canada’s New Democratic Party. (The Canadian Press/Chris Young)

What Jagmeet Singh’s historic NDP leadership win means for Canada

Jagmeet Singh has become the first ethnic minority to become leader of a federal political party. Will his message of "love and courage" best Justin Trudeau's "sunny ways" in the next federal election?
Icy times for mom-to-be meant bad news for baby-on-board. Shaun Best/Reuters

Mom’s prenatal hardship turns baby’s genes on and off

In January 1998 five days of freezing rain collapsed the electrical grid of the Canadian province of Québec. The storm left more than 3 million people without electricity for anywhere from a few hours…
Australian women of different faiths gathered at Sydney’s Lakemba Mosque last month in a show of community solidarity. AAP Image/Tracey Nearmy

Terrorists can be defeated by fighting fear with co-operation

From anarchists in the 1920s and radical leftists in the 1960s, to fringe, extreme-right Christian bombers or gunmen in the United States in recent decades, or radical Islamists such as Islamic State today…

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