Articles on Angola

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A woman votes in Zambia. Beyond multi-party systems and regular elections, many countries resemble very little of true democracies. GovernmentZA/Flickr

Democracy is looking sickly across southern Africa

Democracy is in a parlous state in many countries in southern Africa. Autocrats hold onto power, while electorates have little to choose from at the polls.
The official Angolan broadcaster, or Emissora Oficial de Angola, under construction between 1963-67. Fernão Simões de Carvalho

Propaganda in Portugal’s colonies: lessons for the West today

Portugal used radio propaganda in its colonies in the 1960s against local liberation movements. Decades later there are still lessons to be learned for occupying armies from their failed strategies.
Fidel Castro poured troops into Ethiopia’s war with Somalia after describing Siad Barre as “above all a chauvinist”. Reuters/Prensa Latina

Castro’s troubled legacy in the Horn of Africa: hero or villain?

Many Ethiopians regard Castro as the man who saved their country. Somalis view him as the man who denied them the Greater Somalia re-union
Supporters of president-elect Adama Barrow celebrate his victory in Banjul, the Gambia. Reuters/Thierry Gouegnon

The Gambia keeps dream of deepening democracy in Africa alive

A peaceful transition in the Gambia, taken together with hints of change in Angola and Zimbabwe, will portend hope that Africa’s democratic renewal is still alive.
Climate change and the current El Niño have left Africans more vulnerable than ever to hunger. Philimon Bulawayo/Reuters

Investing in science can help put food on Africa’s plates

Economic growth alone won't end hunger. Good policies and programmes are needed, too. Scientists and researchers have a role to play in these initiatives.
Professor Amivi Kafui Tete-Benissan (left) teaches cell biology and biochemistry at the University of Lomé, in the capital of Togo. Stephan Gladieu/World Bank/Flickr

How Africa can empower more women to become leaders in science

Getting more women into science, technology, engineering and maths fields is a process that involves many parts of a society. Several African countries are setting the pace.
Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe and his wife Grace. Mugabe has been in power since 1980. Reuters/Philimon Bulawayo

How liberators turn into oppressors: a study of southern African states

It is normal for resistance movements to adopt rough survival strategies and techniques while fighting an oppressive regime. Unfortunately that culture takes root and is permanently nurtured.
High-rise buildings amid shacks in Luanda. President Dos Santo has announced plans to retire amid growing unease among Angolans over deepening poverty despite a recent oil boom. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Dos Santos maintains the status quo while suggesting change in Angola

Angola's Dos Santos is buying time. His promise to step down is an attempt to diffuse growing political tensions, as repression continues. He might relinquish his position, but not his power.
Cine Petro Atletica, once Huambo’s finest cinema, was destroyed during fierce fighting in Angola’s bloody civil war. Reuters/John Chiahemen MH/WS

A new narrative unfolds about South Africa’s protracted war in Angola

Apartheid South Africa started a war in which it could not maintain a strategic advantage. It misread the quest for national liberation and international opinion that undermined its effectiveness.
The Nairobi-Thika highway is being built by China Wuyi, Sinohydro and Shengeli Engineering Construction, and is funded by Kenya, China and the African Development Bank. Reuters/Thomas Mukoya

Chinese investment: why the buck stops with African governments

China offers an alternative to traditional donors and investors in low- and middle-income countries. Adding to its appeal is its focus on infrastructure projects.

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