Articles on Architecture

Displaying 61 - 80 of 209 articles

Better office design is not just about shaping space around tasks we do. www.shutterstock.com

Business Briefing: a better way to design an office

Business Briefing: a better to design an office. The Conversation13.9 MB (download)
Research shows that many building codes don't designate the maximum number of people that should fit in an office, but that's not the only problem with standard office design.
The African Union laboratory in Nansana, a suburb of Kampala, Uganda. Ikko Kobayashi and Fumi Kashimura/Terrain-Architects

Ugandan architects struggle with the dilemma of what’s appropriate

There is a growing trend of designing modernised replicas of traditional buildings for entertainment and tourism. That’s no way to salvage positive lessons from building traditions.
Renaissance master Andrea Palladio designed Villa La Rotonda with rooms of various characters, which at night served as viewing boxes for fireworks displays in the surrounding landscape. Bogna/Wikimedia Commons

Friday essay: why a building and its rooms should have a human character

Might we enjoy our homes more if their rooms were characterised by their sense of loftiness or intimacy or cheerfulness or melancholy rather than lifeless labels such as 'media room' or 'home office'?
The Sirius building in 2014: only 12 or so residents are now left and they will soon be moved on. Jenny Noyes/New Zulu

In praise of the Sirius building, a ruined remnant of idealistic times

Sydney's Sirius building - a brutalist classic, providing public housing with waterfront views - will soon be gone. Its loss speaks volumes about our contemporary values and architecture's shift away from utopianism.
The award-winning Naranga Avenue House, by James Russell Architect, features astonishing breeze block design. Photographer Toby Scott

The return of the breeze block

Breeze blocks are having a moment in the sun. Having been painfully hip in the architecture of the 1950s and 60s, they were used so extensively, in both houses and commercial buildings, that they became…
Lithograph, ‘Burning of the Garden Palace, Sydney’, Gibbs Shallard and Company, Sydney, 1882. Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney.

Lighting spotfires under a palace of colonial power

Sydney's Garden Palace, which burned to the ground in 1882, was a monument to empire's glory. Indigenous artist Jonathan Jones is now working on an epic exhibition that will explore this historical epoch from an Aboriginal perspective.
From its earliest days, the influx of outsiders created the distinctive urban character that has driven the development of Shanghai into a modern metropolis. Wenjie, Zhang/flickr

Shanghai, a modern metropolis born of a refugee crisis

From its earliest days as a haven for refugees, Shanghai developed a distinctive character and urban identity that have driven its emergence as one of the world's great metropolises.
The impressive computer aided design of the atrium at Melbourne’s Federation Square. Shutterstock/ChameleonsEye

Computing helps with the complex design of modern architecture

The architect's pen and paper were replaced by the mouse and monitor thanks to developments in computing. Now computers are helping create designs never thought possible before.
In response to the surge of crime in the mid-1990s, suburban dwellers in South Africa began to fortress their houses. Shutterstock

Beyond the unthinkable? City dwellings without security walls

In response to high levels of crime, South Africans have turned their homes into fortresses, seeking security behind high walls. But doing so might be counter-productive.

Top contributors

More