Articles on Donald Trump

Displaying 1 - 20 of 1427 articles

US President Donald Trump talks to high school students about safety on campus following the shooting deaths of 17 people at a Florida school. Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

Arming teachers will only make US school shootings worse

There is not a skerrick of evidence that the Trump plan is workable.
U.S. President Donald Trump points to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau as he welcomes him to the White House in Washington, D.C. in October 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada’s merit-based immigration system is no ‘magic bullet’

Canada's experience shows that selecting immigrants based on economic merit is not a silver bullet; finding the "right" immigrants is the only the first step.
Malcolm Turnbull will be relieved to have some time away from the Barnaby Joyce affair when he arrives in Washington this week. Reuters/Jonathan Ernst

China, North Korea and trade the key talking points when Turnbull meets Trump

When he meets the US president this week, the prime minister will talk about the North Korean nuclear threat, the rise of China, and the rebranded Trans-Pacific Partnership.
Special Counsel Robert Mueller (centre) has laid the first charges from his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election. Reuters/Aaron Bernstein

The first charges over Russian involvement in the US election have been laid – are there more to come?

The indictments issued against a company and 13 individuals show a determination to disrupt the presidential campaign, but there is no allegation of collusion with Donald Trump's team.
‘Farewell, to all my greatness’ — President Andrew Johnson’s departure from office was lampooned by Harper’s Weekly. Library of Congress

Andrew Johnson’s failed presidency echoes in Trump’s White House

A historian looks back at Andrew Johnson's unlikely and unsuccessful presidency and why he wasn't cut out for the job.
DACA supporters march to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement office to protest after the September 2017 announcement that the program would be suspended with a six-month delay. AP Photo/Matt York

In the DACA debate, which version of America – nice or nasty – will prevail?

Throughout America's history, a duality has existed: On one side, there has been the belligerent, aggressive America. On the other, the generous, amiable one.
Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, seen here at the provincial legislature in January, is among politicians who have threatened to sue political foes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

A SLAPP in the face: Democracy suffers when politicians go to court

The trend of politicians suing other politicians is worrisome since it risks limiting free speech. But there's a solution at hand known as anti-SLAPP legislation.
Former senators Scott Ludlam, Nick Xenophon and Sam Dastyari announce the public interest journalism inquiry in May 2017. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Bad politics shouldn’t sink good ideas for public interest journalism

The recommendations of the Senate inquiry into the future of public interest journalism are unlikely to get much traction, but the very real issues it was investigating remain unresolved.
The January 30 address at the State of the Union reveals a lot about the American leader’s excessive character. Nicholas Kamm/AFP

What Donald Trump’s State of the Union address says about his autocratic tendencies

The State of the Union address, a traditional exercise for US presidents was marked this year by a great divergence on tone and words, showing the clear dictatorial style of the American leader.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau walks past Ivanka Trump at the Women and Development event at the G20 summit in July 2017 in Germany. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Why Justin Trudeau is not the leader many believe he is

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is making a political career out of burnishing his self-image and convincing the world he's a human rights leader. Do his actions match his words?
An 1894 cartoon by Frederick Burr Opper criticizes American newspapers’ elasticity with the truth. Library of Congress

A century ago, progressives were the ones shouting ‘fake news’

The practice of calling attention to false stories – with actual fakers then levying the charge on their accusers – dates back to battles between progressive reformers and corporate media outlets.

Top contributors

More