Articles on Oceans

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Larval black sea bass, an important commercial species along the US Atlantic coast. NOAA Fisheries/Ehren Habeck

Fish larvae float across national borders, binding the world’s oceans in a single network

Fish can't read maps, and their eggs and larvae drift across national boundaries. Recent research shows that local problems in one fishery can affect others across wide areas.
An Atlantic cod on ice. Cod fisheries in the North Sea and Irish Sea are declining due to overfishing and climate change. Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Ocean warming has fisheries on the move, helping some but hurting more

As the oceans warm, fish are moving to stay in temperature zones where they have evolved to live. This is helping some species, hurting others and causing a net reduction in potential catch.
It’s OK, I’m a filter feeder: Whale shark off Indonesia. Marcel Ekkel/Flickr

Shark Week looms, but don’t panic

Media coverage of sharks often exaggerates risks to people, but more than 500 shark species have never been known to attack humans, and there's lots to learn about them.
Researchers pour a barrel of hagfish into a holding tank aboard a research vessel about 20 miles off the coast of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. AP/Steven Senne

Curious Kids: What in the world is a slime eel?

Hagfish have been called the most disgusting creatures in the ocean. But what are they?
Anglerfish have an enlarged fin overhanging their eyes and their mouth that acts as a lure – much like bait on a fisherman’s line. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: how would the disappearance of anglerfish affect our environment?

We know very little about the deep sea and how its inhabitants, including anglerfish, will respond to change. In fact, more people have walked on the Moon than have been to the bottom of the ocean.
Oceanix, a proposed floating city, has captured the attention of the UN. OCEANIX/BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

Floating cities: the future or a washed-up idea?

Floating cities are back on the agenda, with the UN recently hosting a meeting on the subject. The latest in a long line of proposals since the '50s was unveiled, but just how feasible is the idea?
Most species of tiny coral reef fish are overlooked because of their small size. Now, their importance for coral reef ecosystems has put these fish and their unique way of life in the limelight. Sinclair-Taylor Tane

Snack-sized ‘candy’ fish explain a coral mystery

New research reveals that miniature, brightly coloured fish play an outsized role in the marine food chain in coral reefs.
Droplets rising from the Champagne vent on the ocean floor in the Mariana Islands. Fluids venting from the site contain dissolved carbon dioxide. NOAA Ocean Explorer

Deep sea carbon reservoirs once superheated the Earth – could it happen again?

Thousands of years ago, carbon gases trapped on the seafloor escaped, causing drastic warming that helped end the last ice age. A scientist says climate change could cause this process to repeat.
The sea is blue because of the way water absorbs light, the way particles in the water scatter light, and also because some of the blue light from the sky is reflected. Flickr/Fiona Paton

Curious Kids: is water blue or is it just reflecting off the sky?

Photons stream from the sun and interact with all matter on Earth. Depending on what the light touches, some of the photons will get absorbed or soaked up. And some will bounce back.

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