Artículos sobre New Zealand stories

Mostrando 81 - 100 de 400 artículos

The land occupation at Ihumātao brings together Māori and heritage activists seeking to stop a housing development on a site that marks the earliest human occupation of New Zealand. Alika Wells/Wikimedia

Land occupation at Ihumātao: why the New Zealand government needs to act cautiously but quickly

The land occupation at Ihumātao, near Auckland's airport, is reviving forms of protest common in the 1970s, now enhanced by new media and led by a new generation of Māorikeen to see grievances addressed.
People with high cultural intelligence are more likely to have broader knowledge of foreign politics and economic systems. from www.shutterstock.com

What it takes to navigate cultural differences in a global business world

People with high cultural intelligence are non-judgemental, tolerant of ambiguity and inclusive – and these qualities mean they are more likely to be successful in global business positions.
The number of Māori and Pasifika students is growing, but they do not see themselves represented among the people who teach them. from www.shutterstock.com

Māori and Pasifika scholars remain severely under-represented in New Zealand universities

New research shows that Māori and Pasifika scholars are significantly under-represented in New Zealand's universities, making up only 5% and 1.7% of the academic workforce, respectively.
Putting a price on greenhouse gas emissions forces us to face at least some of the environmental cost of what we produce and consume. from www.shutterstock.com

Climate explained: how emissions trading schemes work and they can help us shift to a zero carbon future

Traditional market transactions ignore the costs of greenhouse gas emissions. An emissions trading scheme is a tool to put a price on emissions and to influence us to choose lower-emission options.
Union Square: contentious political rallies helped progressive social reformers argue for the protection of freedom of speech and freedom of assembly. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington DC, USA

How New York’s Union Square helped shape free speech in the US

New York's Union Square is an important site in American labor history. One scholar's research illustrates the shifting meanings and inherent tensions of public space as an epicenter of civic life.
More than 50 advertisers have so far withdrawn from Alan Jones’ 2GB radio show, buoyed by social media campaigns naming and shaming those who remain. AAP/Paul Braven

Shoving a sock in it is not the answer. Have advertisers called time on Alan Jones?

The advertising boycott of Alan Jones' radio show highlights which companies advertised on it, but ironically, pulling out now could enhance their brand more than if they had never supported the show.
Rather than encouraging people to become better citizens, rewards and fines can actually reduce peoples’ natural tendencies to do the right thing by others. from www.shutterstock.com

Voter turnout at New Zealand local elections keeps falling, but paying people to vote could backfire

The idea that a small payment could motivate more people to vote resurfaces regularly, but this ignores evidence that monetary incentives to induce pro-social behaviour can be counterproductive.
If it were possible to download the neural networks of a human brain, could we preserve a computer simulation of that person? from www.shutterstock.com

The digital human: the cyber version of humanity’s quest for immortality

The quest for immortality is as old as humanity itself, but the prospect of being able to copy the neural networks of a person's brain shifts the pursuit of perpetual life into the digital world.
New Zealand’s 2018 census was the first to be carried out online, but it captured only 83% of people, a response rate 9% lower than the previous census. Māori responses dropped by 20%. from www.shutterstock.com

Bungled NZ census highlights need for multiple voting options to raise Māori participation

The failure of the 2018 census to get a good response rate highlights the need for multiple voting options to increase participation, particularly of Māori.
Since the last ice age, the ice sheet retreated over a thousand kilometres in the Ross Sea region, more than any other region on the continent. Rich Jones

New research shows that Antarctica’s largest floating ice shelf is highly sensitive to warming of the ocean

New research shows that ocean and air temperatures both contributed to the melting of Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf in the past, but melting from below by a warming ocean became more important over time.
In a recent survey, New Zealand gun owners reported more trust in other gun owners than people who don’t own guns, but lower levels of trust in the pro-gun lobby. from www.shutterstock.com

Survey reveals a third of NZ gun owners distrust gun lobby

New Zealand police is running gun collection events throughout the country as part of the government's amnesty and buyback scheme.
The judge described a grandmother who was sentenced for murder this week as suffering from severe mental health issues and “carer burnout”. from www.shutterstock.com

Grandmother’s case raises question whether NZ should adopt defence of ‘diminished responsibility’

The case of a grandmother who killed her granddaughter after caring for her and other family members for years raises the question: should New Zealand consider mental distress as a defence argument?
The data show no evidence of local anti-Semitism or Islamophobia – but this does not mean that hate towards minority religious groups does not exist in New Zealand. AAP/Mick Tsikas

New survey reveals which religions New Zealanders trust most – and least – after Christchurch shootings

A survey of New Zealanders' attitudes towards religious groups, taken after the Christchurch mosque shootings, shows they trust Buddhists most and Evangelicals least.

Principales colaboradores

Más