Articles sur Cancer risk

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A lot of people have spent a very long time wondering what causes cancer – and scientists still can’t say for certain why an individual person might have it. Marina del Castell/Flickr

Curious Kids: Why do people get cancer?

I have worked on this problem for many years, and to be honest it still blows my mind to really think about just how complex it is.
The science isn’t clear on whether organic foods can lower your risk of cancer. But eating plenty of fruit and veg – however it’s grown – can reduce your risk.

Research Check: can you cut your cancer risk by eating organic?

The participants who chose more organically grown foods over 4.5 years had slightly lower rates of cancer. But it doesn't necessarily mean one thing caused the other.
Many men who have prostate cancer will die with it, rather than of it. from shutterstock.com

PSA testing for prostate cancer is only worth it for some

Since the 1980s, PSA tests have been used for the diagnosis and follow-up of prostate cancer. However, its use as a screening test for prostate cancer remains controversial.
People who are unable to tan and who have moles on their skin are among those at heightened risk of developing melanoma. from shutterstock.com

New online tool can predict your melanoma risk

Australians over the age of 40 can now calculate their risk of developing melanoma with a new online test.
The researchers looked at cancer occurrence in those exposed to higher intakes of ultra-processed foods, compared to lower intakes. Shutterstock

Research Check: will eating ‘ultra-processed’ foods give you cancer?

The study showed that every 10% increase in consumption of ultra-processed food was linked to a 12% increase in developing some types of cancers. But it didn't show the processed food caused cancers.
Physical activity has long been considered a way to lower risk for breast cancer. vectorfusionart/Shutterstock.com

How inherited fitness may affect breast cancer risk

Physical activity is considered an important way to lower risk for breast cancer. But what if your ability to be fit is influenced by genes you inherit? Would that raise your risk? In rats, it did.
Most common childhood cancers are leukemia and Hodgkin lymphoma. Shutterstock

How poverty is killing Kenya’s children with cancer

Most children who have cancer live in the developing world where their survival rate is less than 25%. In Kenya awareness about childhood cancer is low and treatment isn't always readily available.
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) returned to the Capitol July 25 to cast what was a tie-breaking vote to proceed to debate a bill to repeal Obamacare. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

Glioblastoma, a formidable foe, faces a ‘reservoir of resilience’ in McCain

A diagnosis of glioblastoma did not keep John McCain from the Capitol to cast a crucial vote that could end Obamacare. His actions are a reminder that stats are one thing but human beings, another.
A young breast-cancer patient in her home. Fototip/Shutterstock

Is cancer just a question of ‘bad luck’?

Two US researchers have traced the majority of cancers to DNA replication errors during our natural cell replacement. Their finding asks for a renewed inquiry into the role of "chance" in cancer.
Each person’s unique gut microbiota composition is in continuous communication with the immune system. from shutterstock.com

How our gut bacteria affect cancer risk and response to treatment

The composition of bacteria in our gut regulates our immune system. Modifying it - through poo transplants for example - can control cancer risk, as well as response to treatment.
A study found children are at greater risk of developing later cancers from radiation from CT scans. from www.shutterstock.com.au

Weighing the risks and benefits of CT scans in childhood

In a recent study of almost 11 million young Australians, we showed those exposed to a CT scan before the age of 20 had a small increase in cancer risk in the years after exposure.

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