Articles sur Convicts

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Heaven only knows what sort of excursion Wooredy and Truganini thought they had embarked upon on when G.A. Robinson took them to Recherche Bay in 1830 to make an overland trek to the Tasmanian west coast. Cassandra Pybus

Friday essay: journey through the apocalypse

Wooredy and his second wife Truganini set off into the Tasmanian wilderness with settler George Robinson in 1830, on a "conciliatory" mission to find other original Tasmanians. Their stories bear witness to a psychological and cultural transition without parallel in modern colonialism.
Printer George Howe shows the first edition of the Sydney Gazette to Governor Philip Gidley King, in a feature window at the Mitchell Library. Reproduced with permission of the Mitchell Library, State Library of New South Wales, Digital Order Number: a6509002

The science issues this election are as old as the Australian media

What science issues did Australia's first newspaper - edited by a convict - discuss in its letter pages? The same ones we talk about today: the environment, education and health.
What can concealed objects and engraved symbols tell us about our convict past? Ian Evans

These walls can talk: Australian history preserved by folk magic

The discovery of battered old boots, tattered garments, trinkets and dead cats concealed in the walls of historic buildings sheds new light on the lives of Australia's early white settlers.
Australia’s shared past with Brazil enriches understanding of the two former European colonies. EPA/Antonio Lacerda

I Go to Rio: Australia’s forgotten history with Brazil

The First Fleet had three layovers on its voyage to Australia – one was Rio de Janeiro. As Australia and Brazil celebrate 70 years of diplomatic relations, it's worth remembering this encounter.
A century after governments wished to erase the convict past, their place in Australian history was being celebrated in programs such as The Colony on SBS. AAP/Hilton Cordell Productions/Simon Cardwell

Stain or badge of honour? Convict heritage inspires mixed feelings

Today, a convict ancestor is a matter of pride. But for past generations, including some convicts themselves, it was a shame that had to be hidden at all costs.

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