Articles sur Migrants

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Members of the migrant caravan, mostly Hondurans, cross a river that separates Guatemala and Mexico. EPA/Esteban Biba

Origins and implications of the caravan of Honduran migrants

Honduran migrants trudging north towards the US-Mexico border are fleeing violence and poverty that has its roots in activities of 10th-century American fruit companies.
We can make conscious decisions about how we live together in closer proximity that allow for both cultural diversity and a shared sense of community. Ján Jakub Naništa/Unsplash

Speaking with: Chris Ho and Edgar Liu about diversity and high density in our cities

Dallas Rogers speaks with Chris Ho and Edgar Liu about what's going on in apartment buildings as we move up, rather than out, and how we can look after ourselves and each other in culturally diverse, high-density living.
A photograph by Oliver de Ros presents a different impression of the migrants at the Guatemalan border than the standard tropes published. Migrants bound for the U.S.-Mexico border wait on a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River, connecting Guatemala and Mexico, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Oliver de Ros)

Visual tropes of migration tell predictable but misleading stories

Photographs can influence us -- they can inspire us to act and they can also impact the way we think about issues. The recent published photos about the migrant 'caravan' convey several stereotypes.
A new group of Central American migrants walk past Mexican Federal Police after wading across the Suchiate River, that connects Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 29, 2018. (AP Photo/Santiago Billy)

Why does the migrant ‘caravan’ exist? And how did it come to be?

A migrant caravan of almost 7,000 people who left Guatemala and Honduras is heading north towards the United States. The reasons they are leaving are complex but involve a U.S.-backed violent history.
Costa Ricans held a march in solidarity with Nicaraguan refugees on Aug. 25, 2018. An estimated 500,000 Nicaraguans live in Costa Rica, with more arriving daily as crisis in the country deepens. Reuters/Juan Carlos Ulate

Migrant money could be keeping Nicaragua’s uprising alive

Nicaraguan migrants send over US$1 billion home each year. This money has played a changing role in domestic politics – first boosting the Ortega regime and, now, sustaining the uprising against him.
Utö, Finland, graffiti. Torture is a process which doesn’t stop at the event itself but that eventually goes on through generations. aaron blanco tejedor/Unsplash

How torture tears apart societies from within

Torture is such a profound tear in the fabric that makes us human that it can distort even the most fundamental elements of social existence.
Three years into a protracted political and economic crisis, Venezuela has seen TK million migrants — TK percent of its population — flee. Reuters/Luisa Gonzalez

Refugees from Venezuela are fleeing to Latin American cities, not refugee camps

Up to 5,000 refugees flee hunger and chaos in Venezuela each day – a migrant crisis rivaling Syria's. Most arrive to poor South American border cities that are dangerously unprepared for the influx.
Sirley Silveira Paixao, an immigrant from Brazil seeking asylum, kisses her 10-year-old son Diego Magalhaes, after he is released from immigration detention in Chicago on July 5, 2018. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

Drugging detained children is like using a chemical straitjacket

Psychotropic medication is 'pharmaceutical violence' against migrant children and other incarcerated youth throughout the United States. Drug addiction is one consequence.
In this June 2016 photo, a border patrol agent walks near the secondary fence separating Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

America needs more, not fewer, migrant workers

Free trade requires not just the free movement of goods, but of people too. If Donald Trump really wants the U.S. to have a competitive advantage, he should be encouraging more, not fewer, migrants.
Migrants in Sangatte, 2008. No border Network/Flickr

Migrants: deaths in the name of law

Little thought has been accorded to the way in which political and bureaucratic actors prioritise certain lives over others in their (non) decision-making.
Border Patrol agent Robert Rodriguez, working in the Rio Grande Valley REUTERS/Loren Elliott

A night enforcing immigration laws on the US-Mexico border

In Texas' Lower Rio Grande Valley, Border Patrol agents must ignore blistering heat and 25 mile-an-hour winds. Their job is simple: Catch terrorists, people without papers or those carrying drugs.

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