Articles sur Oceans

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The submersible Alvin about 8,500 feet down, studying seafloor volcanoes and eruptions. (c) Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with thanks to Daniel Fornari – WHOI-MISO Facility (www.whoi.edu/miso) and National Science Foundation

Scientist at work: I’m a geologist who’s dived dozens of times to explore submarine volcanoes

When you study volcanoes at mid-ocean ridges, doing fieldwork means becoming an aquanaut – diving thousands of feet to the ocean floor in the submersible Alvin, trading tight quarters for amazing views.
Teenager Alex Weber and friends collected nearly 40,000 golf balls hit into the ocean from a handful of California golf courses. Alex Weber

A teen scientist helped me discover tons of golf balls polluting the ocean

Snorkeling off the California coast, a high school student found heaps of golf balls on the ocean floor. With a marine scientist, she showed that golf courses were producing tons of plastic pollution.
The Giant Sea Bass at the California Academy of Sciences. Fishes'sense of smell is highly affected by high level of carbon dioxide in the ocean. Togabi/Wikimedia

Ocean fish are under threat if we don’t curb carbon dioxide emissions

Increase of carbon dioxide in the ocean affects the way fish detect predators, mates or food and could threaten not only individual fish but entire populations.
Globalised fishing can leave workers vulnerable to exploitation. Shutterstock.com

How to keep slave-caught seafood off your plate

A lack of sustainability, profitability and transparency in the global fishing industry is exacerbating the problem of slave-like working conditions for crew. Here are the warning signs to look out for.
The ocean absorbs about 90 percent of the excess heat produced as climate change warms the earth. Image Catalog

New findings on ocean warming: 5 questions answered

According to a new study, the oceans have absorbed more heat from climate change than previously thought. This could mean the Earth will warm even faster in the future than scientists have predicted.
A member of a rare group of 410-million-year-old jawless fishes from Australia meets a mate. along the shoreline (artist’s impression). Nobumichi Tamura

Ancient fish evolved in shallow seas – the very places humans threaten today

New research shows shallow, near-land seas similar to Bass Strait were critical in the early days of fish evolution. These are the waters we need to protect now to ensure ongoing biodiversity.
A three-banded clownfish (Amphiprion ocellaris) navigates the anemones of the Andaman Coral Reef, India. Ritiks/Wikipedia

Why does Nemo the clownfish have three white stripes? The riddle solved at last

Our children all know the little clownfish Nemo, star of the Pixar film. But why does he have three stripes, rather than one or two? Developmental and evolutionary biology are revealing the answer.

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