Articles sur Oceans

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Plastic trash on San Francisco’s Ocean Beach. Kevin Krejci

Bait and switch: Anchovies eat plastic because it smells like prey

A new study shows that anchovies – key food for larger fish – are attracted to plastic trash because it smells like food. This suggests that toxic substances in plastic could move up through food chains.
Giant kelp can grow up to 60cm a day, given the right conditions. Joe Belanger/shutterstock.com

How farming giant seaweed can feed fish and fix the climate

In an extract from his new book, Tim Flannery explains how giant kelp farms could suck carbon dioxide from the air and store it in the ocean's depths, while encouraging species like fish and oysters.
Great white photobomb. George T. Probst/NOAA/Flickr

Ocean life: 5 essential reads

The world's oceans are home to innumerable life forms, from sponges to sea lions, and scientists have many creative ways of studying them.
Furious winds keep the McMurdo Dry Valleys in Anarctica free of snow and ice. Calcites found in the valleys have revealed the secrets of ancient subglacial volcanoes. Stuart Rankin/Flickr

Volcanoes under the ice: melting Antarctic ice could fight climate change

Melting ice from Antartica could feed vast plankton blooms, trapping carbon in the ocean. To understand this complex mechanism, researchers looked at volcanoes deep under glaciers.
In sharks’ territory. Warm Winds Surf Shop/Flickr

Culling sharks won’t protect surfers

Professional surfers have called for culling sharks to reduce the risk of attacks. A shark biologist explains why culling will not work and surfers should accept risk when they enter the water.
Whitespotted surgeonfish (Acanthurus guttatus), found in the Indo-Pacific, crop the upper portion of algae while feeding, preventing macroalgae from becoming established on reefs. Kevin Lino/NOAA

Understanding the conditions that foster coral reefs’ caretaker fishes

Plant-eating fish control the spread of seaweed and algae on coral reefs. New research explaining why populations of these fish vary from site to site could lead to better reef protection strategies.
Many seabird species, including the blue petrel (Halobaena caerulea), consume plastic at sea because algae on the plastic produce an odor that resembles their food sources. J.J. Harrison

The oceans are full of plastic, but why do seabirds eat it?

Thousands of seabirds die every year from consuming plastic trash in the oceans. But why do they eat plastic? New research shows that it produces odors that help some species find prey.

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