Articles sur Sharks

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 92 articles

Great white photobomb. George T. Probst/NOAA/Flickr

Ocean life: 5 essential reads

The world's oceans are home to innumerable life forms, from sponges to sea lions, and scientists have many creative ways of studying them.
A shark’s nose is chemosensory only, and it doesn’t join up to the back of the throat like ours does. Flickr/Leszek Leszczynski

Curious Kids: Do sharks sneeze?

Sharks can't sneeze like we do, but they can do other cool tricks -- like making their stomach stick out of their mouth to get rid of unwanted stuff.
In sharks’ territory. Warm Winds Surf Shop/Flickr

Culling sharks won’t protect surfers

Professional surfers have called for culling sharks to reduce the risk of attacks. A shark biologist explains why culling will not work and surfers should accept risk when they enter the water.
Helicopters hover over Bondi Beach after spotting a shark. AAP Image/NEWZULU/TOM CASKA

How drones can help fight the war on shark attacks

LIfeguards could potentially have a new ally in the fight to reduce shark incidents: drones that can spot when a shark swims nearby, and automatically alert authorities.
Shelly Beach near Ballina, one of the new shark net locations, was the scene of a fatal shark attack in February 2015. Dave Hunt/AAP

Not just nets: how to stop shark attacks without killing sharks

Shark nets are controversial, which is why the New South Wales government is investigating a host of other ways to keep humans and sharks apart – some more tried and tested than others.
Loving our monsters? We’ll learn more by researching sharks than by kiling them. ScreenWest/AAP

Relax, shark numbers aren’t booming, but more research can make us safer

The best way to guard against shark attacks is to study them, not kill them. Because while the alleged "shark boom" almost certainly not real, the more we know about sharks, the better.

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