Articles sur White sharks

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A shark’s nose is chemosensory only, and it doesn’t join up to the back of the throat like ours does. Flickr/Leszek Leszczynski

Curious Kids: Do sharks sneeze?

Sharks can't sneeze like we do, but they can do other cool tricks -- like making their stomach stick out of their mouth to get rid of unwanted stuff.
Shelly Beach near Ballina, one of the new shark net locations, was the scene of a fatal shark attack in February 2015. Dave Hunt/AAP

Not just nets: how to stop shark attacks without killing sharks

Shark nets are controversial, which is why the New South Wales government is investigating a host of other ways to keep humans and sharks apart – some more tried and tested than others.
Loving our monsters? We’ll learn more by researching sharks than by kiling them. ScreenWest/AAP

Relax, shark numbers aren’t booming, but more research can make us safer

The best way to guard against shark attacks is to study them, not kill them. Because while the alleged "shark boom" almost certainly not real, the more we know about sharks, the better.
Choosing to swim or surf at a beach with shark spotters or lifeguards may save you a limb or your life. Glencairn Leigh de Necker

Four useful tips on how to be shark smart this summer

Despite low shark attack numbers, many people are afraid of being bitten. There are, however, ways to steer clear of these creatures.
A greynurse shark complete with a tracking device - scientifically the best way to keep tabs on what sharks are up to. AAP Image/NSW Ministery for Agriculture and Fisheries

Mike Baird is right, culling sharks doesn’t work – here’s what we can do instead

Calls are growing louder for a shark cull in New South Wales. But like in Western Australia, which infamously experimented with culling last year, a NSW cull would harm sharks while failing to protect people.
The moment a shark encounters Australian champion surfer Mick Fanning. AAP Image/World Surf League, Kirstin Scholtz

Spectacular shark encounters: Fanning’s close shave reminds us we share the ocean

Although frightening, the footage of Mick Fanning at Jeffreys Bay is a reminder that sharks are present in the oceans, and that the vast majority of interactions between people and sharks end without fatality or injury.
Western Australia has killed two great white sharks after a surfer was seriously injured last week. Sharkdiver.com/Wikimedia Commons

Response to the latest shark bite is fuelled by myth and retribution

When I used to tell people that I did my PhD on the politics of shark attacks, they would ask, “Is there a politics to shark attacks?” Nobody asks that any more. Now they just say, “Oh, like in Western…
A 2.6 m tiger shark entangled in a WA drum line. It was officially released alive - whether it survived is another matter. Neil Henderson/supplied

WA’s shark cull didn’t answer the big ocean safety questions

As Western Australia’s Environmental Protection Authority and the federal environment minister Greg Hunt mull the question of whether to let the state government resume its controversial shark cull next…
The WA government has caught 172 sharks since installing drum lines - but not a single great white. AAP IMAGE/ SEA SHEPHERD

Five take-home messages from WA’s official shark cull numbers

Perhaps predictably, the Western Australian government has claimed that its shark drum line season, which ended last week, was a success. In a media statement, fisheries minister Ken Baston said that “172…
Wave of protest: surfers were among thousands who rallied at Cottesloe Beach against the Barnett government’s shark cull. AAP Image/Theron Kirkman

WA shark cull season ends, and ocean users don’t want it to return

The end of April marks the end of Western Australia’s shark cull – for now at least. Since January 25, dozens of sharks (the WA government has not yet released official figures) have been killed off popular…
Western Australia’s shark kills follow decades of similar policy in Queensland. AAP Image/Sea Shepherd

Has Queensland really saved lives by killing thousands of sharks?

One of the most common justifications for Western Australia’s shark cull is the longstanding use of baited hooks - or drum lines - in regions such as Queensland. Two key questions need answering. First…

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