Articles sur Psychology research

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A quirky quiz probably isn’t going to tell you much about your innermost essence. StunningArt/Shutterstock.com

Personality tests with deep-sounding questions provide shallow answers about the ‘true’ you

Few can resist an assessment that promises to reveal your hidden, true self. But new research suggests that people mistakenly believe difficult to answer questions offer deep insights.
We don’t automatically question information we read or hear. Gaelfphoto/Shutterstock.com

Why you stink at fact-checking

Cognitive psychologists know the way our minds work means we not only don't notice errors and misinformation we know are wrong, we also then remember them as true.
It’s actually a big developmental milestone. BlurryMe/Shutterstock.com

Watching children learn how to lie

In a new study, psychologists observed young children in real time figuring out how not to tell the truth.
Culturally biased psychology research and the advice based on it ends up in textbooks. But it’s not appropriate for everyone. from www.shutterstock.com

How parenting advice assumes you’re white and middle class

Most psychology research that forms the basis of parenting advice might not apply to you. So, how do you know whether to trust it?
Don’t underestimate what I get about the world around me. Baby image via www.shutterstock.com.

Children understand far more about other minds than long believed

A revolution in the tools and techniques developmental psychologists use to investigate kids' knowledge and capabilities is rewriting what we know about how and when children understand their world.
Students of both genders carry around stereotypes about school achievement. Children image via www.shutterstock.com.

Stereotypes can hold boys back in school, too

Recent research raised concerns about girls' stereotypes on their gender's lack of 'brilliance.' But an overlooked finding suggests boys also hold hindering stereotypes about themselves in school.
I can’t see you, you can’t see me. Child image via www.shutterstock.com.

Young children are terrible at hiding – psychologists have a new theory why

Little kids cover their own eyes and feel hidden, even if they're still fully visible. New research suggests this doesn't mean children can't understand others' perspectives, as had been assumed.

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