Articles sur Science

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 178 articles

Scientist and inventor Rick Sanchez of the animated series Rick and Morty embodies the erroneous popular archetype of the scientist as eccentric lone genius. (Handout)

Myth of the genius solitary scientist is dangerous

The myth of the lone genius, hero scientist is dangerous for science and society. Here's how to fix it.
Cannabis plant strains in jars in MediJean’s Health Canada-licensed tissue culture development lab are kept for research as manager Abdul Ahad works in the Richmond, B.C., facility, in this 2014 file photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How to grow cannabis? With modern science and technology

The legal cannabis industry will have to develop scientific research and evidence based growth methods and technology if it is to succeed against the secretive illicit industry.
Research shows that when parents engage in simple science projects with their kids at home, it boosts their learning in school. (Shutterstock)

Science in the home boosts children’s academic success

From collecting bugs to using math apps, there are many ways parents can engage in STEM activities with their kids to support their learning.
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Dr. Mona Nemer, Canada’s new chief science adviser, check out a robot that launches balls, with science fair participants Van Bernat and Kate O'Melia of Governor Simcoe Secondary School in St. Catharines, Ont., on Parliament Hill in September. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick)

Science in Canada needs funding, not photo-ops

Science funding still falls short of 2005 levels. It's time for Canada's government to fix that problem, before it's too late.
Navdeep Bains, Canada’s innovation, science and economic development minister, takes part in a technology event in Ottawa in May 2017. The Canadian government has started up a $1.26-billion fund to support innovation-related business investments. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Is there too much emphasis on STEM fields at universities?

If leaders of educational institutions are concerned about the employability of graduates, they should avoid over-investing in STEM subjects and stop snubbing liberal arts.
Strange new materials that propel the fictional Star Trek universe are being developed by scientists in reality today. Above, the USS Discovery accelerates to warp speed in an artist’s rendition for the TV series Star Trek Discovery. (Handout)

How quantum materials may soon make Star Trek technology reality

Advanced materials that seem like they come from Star Trek are becoming reality today.
If the government expanded the new $73 million Student Work-Integrated Learning program to all students it could help tackle Canada’s most intractable social problems — such as homelessness, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, affordable housing, social cohesion and intercultural understanding.

Government should expand student placements into social sector

A new government program will create 10,000 work placements for undergraduates in only business and STEM subjects. Why not fund students to innovate in the social sector too?
Balinese farmers with Mount Agung in the background. Areas with high volcanic activity also have some of the world’s most fertile farmlands. Reuters/Darren Whiteside

How Mount Agung’s eruption can create the world’s most fertile soil

Volcanic ash can cause a nuisance to farmers, burying agricultural lands and damaging crops. But in the long term, this ash will create highly productive soil that can support huge populations.
Former astronaut Julie Payette urges Canada to use science, knowledge, and innovation as paths to better future for all, during her installation ceremony as Canada’s 29th Governor General in the Senate chamber of Parliament on Oct. 2. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)

Co-operative research revolution could answer call to transform science and society

Society needs more research that is both excellent and useful. We can achieve this by shifting the academic culture toward research that is Highly Integrative Basic and Responsive (HIBAR).
Cmdr. Michael Burnham (Sonequa Martin-Green) goes on a scientifically implausible spacewalk in Star Trek: Discovery. (Handout)

How ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ warps science

Star Trek Discovery is the latest offering in the 50-year-old science fiction franchise beloved by scientists — but it isn't about science.
Michael Shannon and Michael Stuhlbarg in the film “The Shape of Water.” (Kerry Hayes /Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation All Rights Reserved)

TIFF 2017: Movie magic from math and science

This year's Toronto International Film Festival is a further example of how science, technology, engineering and math illuminate movies – and, in the process, our minds.
Women are less likely to be published in scientific journals. Shutterstock

Women scientists lag in academic publishing, and it matters

Women can often draw attention to dimensions of thinking that their male perspective may miss. But this will only work if they are in positions that allow them to lead and drive the research agenda.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus