Articles sur Science

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‘Design for a giant crossbow.’ Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo joined art with engineering

As Leonardo da Vinci found centuries ago, scholars of art, design, engineering and science can work together for mutual benefit.
Héloïse Chochois, "Embedded with Physicists” “Physics Reimagined” coll.

Seven common myths about quantum physics

Quantum physics and its mysteries… And what if this supposedly incomprehensible science weren’t so difficult for non-scientists to understand?
Seen here with the Prime Minister, Karen Andrews is one of few recent ministers for science who has a university education in STEM. Mick Tsikas / AAP

STEM is worth investing in, but Australia’s major parties offer scant details on policy and funding

We've had ten federal ministers with titular responsibility for science since 2007 – five under the coalition and five under Labor. That variation and a lack of consistent vision has an impact.
The sea is blue because of the way water absorbs light, the way particles in the water scatter light, and also because some of the blue light from the sky is reflected. Flickr/Fiona Paton

Curious Kids: is water blue or is it just reflecting off the sky?

Photons stream from the sun and interact with all matter on Earth. Depending on what the light touches, some of the photons will get absorbed or soaked up. And some will bounce back.
Most of us make daily decisions about who we choose to work and collaborate with. So what if we used that to improve professional diversity? rawpixel / unsplash

My CV is gender biased. Here’s what I plan to do about it

A confession: I can count on a single hand the number of women I have invited to collaborate with me on publications and grants.
Our decision-making and conduct is influenced by what we read, see or hear. (Shutterstock)

Why we see hope for the future of science journalism

Science is a part of everyday life. Science journalists can do more to connect science to the public.
It’s a good idea to wash your hands after you go to the toilet, after you blow your nose, before you help prepare food and before you eat. Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Curious Kids: why do we need soap?

While we move soap around, it lifts up invisible oil that holds germs onto your hand.
Women scientists are under-represented in science awards with large monetary value, but over-represented in service awards. Shutterstock

Minding the gender gap in science prizes

Women scientists are under-represented in science awards with large monetary value, but over-represented in service awards.
Mountains keep growing and growing and growing for many millions of years until they are so heavy that they can no longer grow taller, only wider. Photo by Jeff Finley on Unsplash

Curious Kids: how do mountains form?

When I was little, geologists worked out Earth's surface was made of pieces, like a giant puzzle. Those pieces, called “tectonic plates”, move and bump into each other and mountains form.
Colour blind people are really good at spotting things that are far away, and they are better than most people at telling things apart by their shape. Shutterstock

Curious Kids: why are people colour blind?

Some colour blind people only have two kinds of cone cell in their eye. Others have three kinds, but the cones do not pick up the same light waves as the cone cells in most people's eyes do.

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