Articles sur Biology

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 143 articles

Worms do have something in their mouth that they can poke out, like a tongue. It is called a stylet. Flickr/DJ SINGH

Curious Kids: Do worms have tongues?

The short answer is no. But worms can use different parts of their body to do some of the jobs that our tongues do - like tasting and crushing food.
Tom/Flickr

When evolution and biotechnologies collide

Simple and inexpensive gene-editing technology such as CRISPR has made the creation of genetically modified organisms much easier. But could nature still keep the upper hand?
Image of a five-knot tori algorithmically. Tanaka Juuyoh/Flickr

Don’t blame it on algorithms: what they really are and how they can fuel progress in the life sciences

Today algorithms are ubiquitous, yet often misunderstood. Rather than mysterious entities, they're closer to recipes, and the quality of the output depends on the input – in their case, data.
Once the coat around the seed is moistened, the embryo cells expand and burst out in a process called germination. shutterstock/NUM LPPHOTO

Curious Kids: how can a tiny seed actually grow into a huge tree?

A seed contains nearly everything a tree needs to get growing. Just add a dash of water, a bit of warmth and the right location, and you'll be seeing green in no time.
Laboratory mice are among the first animals to have their diseases treated by CRISPR. tiburi via Pixabay.com

CRISPR controversy raises questions about gene-editing technique

A new research paper reports dangerous side effects in CRISPR-edited mice. Some scientists are pushing back, placing blame for the unwanted mutations on the experiment, not the technique.
How do they do while sleeping what we can barely do at all? Carlos Bustamante Restrepo

Neuromechanics of flamingos’ amazing feats of balance

These birds spend long periods, often asleep, standing on one leg. Is it passive biomechanics or active nervous system control of their muscles that allows them to do easily what's impossible for us?
Polysaccharide molecules such as cellulose, seen here, are long chains of sugars that are very hard to break apart. Enzymes – proteins that can degrade polysaccharides – have many industrial uses. CeresVesta/Wikipedia

Scientist at work: Bio-prospecting for better enzymes

Bio-prospecting is the search for useful materials from natural sources. A biologist explains what we can learn from bacteria about breaking down plant material, and how we can use that knowledge.
Enzymes, the catalysts of biology, can engulf and break down hundreds of nerve agent molecules per second. Image: Pymol. PDB 4E3T rcsb.org

Enzymes versus nerve agents: Designing antidotes for chemical weapons

Scientists invented chemical weapons; some are now working to destroy them. New biomolecular design techniques let researchers design proteins that can destroy nerve agents in bodies.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus