Articles sur Evolution

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Wild grey seal eating a large Atlantic salmon after first peeling back the skin using its teeth and claws. Robert Harris

Sharp claws helped ancient seals conquer the oceans

Northern seals use strong claws to tear apart large prey and this gives us clues about how the earliest seals likely behaved when they first began feeding in water.
Dogs don’t follow the rules on larger animals living longer. Cindy Zhi/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Curious Kids: Why don’t dogs live as long as humans?

Dogs don't follow the rules on larger animals living longer. A 70kg Great Dane is lucky to reach seven years, but a 4kg Chihuahua can live for 10 years or more.
Watching bacteria and viruses duke it out, evolving to outwit each other. UC San Diego

Discovery of a surprise multitasking gene helps explain how new functions and features evolve

A core idea in molecular biology is that one gene codes for one protein. Now biologists have found an example of a gene that yields two forms of a protein – enabling it to evolve new functionality.
Some people thought Charles Darwin was suggesting that, over a very long period of time, apes turned into people. He was not. Flickr/Ronald Woan

Curious Kids: Can chimpanzees turn into people?

The short answer is no. An individual of one species cannot, during its lifetime, turn into another species. But your question helps us think about life, evolution and what it means to be human.
Several thousand people gather at a rally in Washington in 1952 to hear Evangelist Billy Graham preach. AP Photo

Could there be another Billy Graham?

Current trends suggest that evangelicalism is out of step with younger Americans. But, a scholar says, evangelicalism has been here before.
Fossilized teeth from a modern human who lived in Israel close to 200,000 years ago. Israel Hershkovitz, Tel Aviv University

Fossil jawbone from Israel is the oldest modern human found outside Africa

New discoveries are changing archaeologists' ideas about the origins of our own species and our migration out of Africa. This fossil pushes Homo sapiens' African exodus date back by 50,000 years.

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