Articles sur Wildlife

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Talking about ivory-funded terrorism overlooks the real sources of income for terror groups. Author supplied

Why blaming ivory poaching on Boko Haram isn’t helpful

The idea that terror groups like Boko Haram fund their activities through ivory poaching in Africa is a compelling narrative. But it’s undermining wildlife conservation and human rights.
This Auroch skeleton from Denmark dates to around 7,500BC. The circles indicate where the animal was wounded by arrows. Malene Thyssen./Wikimedia

The quest to revive extinct Aurochs to restore ancient lands

Bringing back aurochs is a competitive and ambitious venture aiming at recreating wilderness in Europe. But ethical and scientific questions linger.
Grizzly trophy-hunting is at the heart of a ferocious debate in North America. (Shutterstock)

Fierce debate roars to life over grizzly bear hunt

A bitter debate has erupted over the British Columbia government's recent decision to end grizzly bear trophy hunting. Here are the pros and cons of stopping the hunt.
In the Serengeti wildebeest will move more than 2000km during their annual migration. Sarah Durant

Fences are an increasing threat to Africa’s migratory wildlife

Many mammals depend on large areas and trans-boundary conservation for their survival. When this is obstructed it can have a catastrophic impact on animal populations.
If frogs can glow in the dark and cockroaches can change history, why couldn’t dog-birds exist? Chris Goldberg / flickr

Global series: Wild world

A collection of The Conversation Global's best articles on animals, from glow-in-the-dark frogs to the wood beetles that do humanity's dirty work.
A red fox listening for prey under the snow in Yellowstone National Park. Noise can affect foxes and other animals that rely on their hearing when they hunt. Neal Herbert/NPS

Human noise pollution is disrupting parks and wild places

A recent study finds that noise from human activities is intruding into many parks and other protected areas. Creating quiet zones and noise corridors can help reduce impacts from noise pollution.
It can be easier to raise money to aid animals like these African elephants than species that are more threatened with extinction but get humans less excited. www.shutterstock.com

Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction

Must the money raised to save wildlife always aid the most popular animals? New research suggests that marketing can persuade donors that northern hairy-nosed wombat lives matter too.
Aggressive behaviour exhibited by socially dominant Tasmanian devils may predispose them to infection with devil facial tumour disease. Sebastien Compte/University of Tasmania

Survival of the fittest? Perhaps not if you’re a Tasmanian devil

It's the Tasmanian devils that enjoy the highest survival and breeding success who're more likely to get the fatal facial tumour disease.
The Pinocchio anole lizard (Anolis probiscis) was first described in Ecuador in 1953, then believed to have become extinct until it was rediscovered in 2005. Javier Abalos Alvarez/Flickr

Will optimistic stories get people to care about nature?

'Doom and gloom' messages about nature are less effective than positive ones. The Lost & Found project tells the stories of creatures thought long gone but eventually rediscovered.
Part of a shipment of 33 rhino horns seized by Hong Kong customs, originated from Cape Town, South Africa. Bobby Yip /Reuters

Why is the illicit rhino horn trade escalating?

Rhino horn trade continues to be a highly lucrative business across the world.

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