Articles sur Wildlife

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Cal Fire Division Chief Mark Higgins directs helicopters dropping water in Lakeport, California. AP Photo/Noah Berger

Wildfires are inevitable – increasing home losses, fatalities and costs are not

As California reels from another devastating fire season, environmental resource scholars explain how the state – and other fire-prone areas – can better prepare and coexist with wildfires.
Conservation groups are organizing soccer games to help bridge the gaps between park rangers and communities. (Shutterstock)

How soccer games can help protect wildlife

Environmental organizations are using games to engage communities on conservation matters.
A research study found that most of the debris in gulls’ stomachs is plastic – exposing the birds to high levels of chemical contaminants and potentially limiting their reproductive success. (Shutterstock)

All-you-can-eat landfill buffet spells trouble for birds

Seagulls have no qualms about sifting through dumps for scraps. But this buffet comes at a cost, filling their stomachs with plastic, glass, metal and even building materials.
Dingoes are usually solitary, but can forage in groups near human settlements where food is abundant. Klaasmer/Wikimedia Commons

Why do dingoes attack people, and how can we prevent it?

An attack on a WA mine worker has highlighted the danger of wild dingoes, particularly when attracted by humans' food - one of the factors that can make an attack by wild predators much more likely.
Red fox under cover of darkness in London. Jamie Hall. For use only with this article.

To avoid humans, more wildlife now work the night shift

It's becoming harder and harder for animals to find human-free spaces on the planet. New research suggests that to try to avoid people, mammals are shifting activity from the day to the nighttime.
Snowshoe hares near the now closed Giant Mine outside of Yellowknife, N.W.T show signs of arsenic contamination. (Denali NPS/flickr)

Toxic leftovers from Giant Mine found in snowshoe hares

Historical gold mining at the Giant Mine near Yellowknife, N.W.T. released toxic arsenic into the environment. Snowshoe hares are showing signs of poisoning.
Black tip sharks swim with tropical fish in a lagoon in French Polynesia. (Shutterstock)

Killing sharks, wolves and other top predators won’t solve conflicts

When humans have conflicts with wildlife, the first reaction is often to cull them. But there's little evidence to show that it works, and removing predators can even backfire and make things worse.
The male cardinal tenderly feeding his mate is just one example of the hard work wild animals undertake in springtime. That work often benefits humans. (Shutterstock)

How the hard work of wild animals benefits us too

Wild animals are hard at work this spring. Here's how their hard labour benefits humans, and why we should be more appreciative.

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