Articles sur Biodiversity

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 233 articles

The thorny devil, one of Australia’s many remarkable and unique animals. Euan Ritchie

Australia’s draft ‘Strategy for nature’ doesn’t cut it. Here are nine ways to fix it

Most of Australia's plants and animals are found nowhere else on Earth. This remarkable biodiversity requires a bolder, brighter conservation vision.
In the Global Biodiversity Information Facility there are 682,447 records of human encounters with dandelions. from

AI is learning from our encounters with nature – and that’s a concern

Does big data threaten how humans explore the natural world? We need to protect our impulses to observe, compare, play, discover and love, no matter what technological capabilities are available.
A long-term monitoring project in Simpson Desert provides crucial information about the ecosystem. Mina Guli/Flickr

Australia among the world’s worst on biodiversity conservation

Australia is among seven countries contributing to more than half of the world's biodiversity loss. Yet next month, a crucial network of long-term research sites will lose funding.
Sulawesi, part of the biogeographical region of Wallacea, is home to tarsiers – tiny, goggle-eyed creatures look more like mammalian tree frogs than monkeys. Ondrej Prosicky/

Wallacea: a living laboratory of evolution

The central islands of Indonesia, also known as Wallacea, is a place of wonder, a living laboratory for the study of evolution.
Adélie penguin at the Mt Siple breeding colony, West Antarctica. Jasmine Lee

The winners and losers of Antarctica’s great thaw

Climate change is set to expand Antarctica's ice-free area, potentially helping native species to flourish but also paving the way for invasive species to gain a foothold.
The High Line in New York City, a former elevated railroad trestle converted to a public park. Shinya Suzuki/Flickr

Urban nature: What kinds of plants and wildlife flourish in cities?

In an urbanizing world, people increasingly are seeking out nature in cities. Research shows that diverse species of animals, plants and insects can thrive in areas that humans have altered.
Angustoniscus amieuensis, a New Caledonian cockroach that lives in the moist forests of the island. P.Grandcolas

How a humble cockroach rewrote the history of New Caledonia

The theory that New Caledonia was a piece of land that separated from the ancient supercontinent of Gondwana was a seductive one. But then a cockroach rose up to challenge it.
Hundreds of large old trees were removed when the Hume Highway was widened. Brian Yap/Flickr

The plan to protect wildlife displaced by the Hume Highway has failed

When the Hume Highway was widened, hundreds of nest boxes were installed to replace habitat for three threatened species. Four years of monitoring has concluded the program is entirely unsuccessful.
Dingoes can help manage devastating red fox and feral cat numbers, but only if we let enough of them live in key areas. Bobby Tamayo

Thinking big gives top predators the competitive edge

Dingoes and wolves can help control destructive smaller predators, new research shows, but only if we encourage them across wide areas.

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