Articles sur Women in politics

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Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who won her bid for a seat in the House of Representatives in New York’s 14th Congressional District, asks 2014 Nobel Laureate Malala Yousafzai a question at the Kennedy School’s Institute of Politics at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. on Dec. 6, 2018. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is shaking up old politics with her new style

Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (known as AOC), the youngest woman to be elected to the U.S. Congress, has an authentic voice that is rising in popularity.
New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern wore a headscarf to comfort mourning family members after the Christchurch mosque shootings. AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File

Is there a ‘feminine’ response to terrorism?

After the Christchurch mosque shootings, New Zealand's prime minister didn't start a war on terror. She covered her head, cried, paid for funerals and passed gun control. Is it because she's a woman?
Japan’s Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako at their residence Togu Palace in Tokyo, Feb. 17, 2019. Imperial Household Agency of Japan/Handout via Reuters

Japan’s new emperor is a modern, multilingual environmentalist

Japan's 86-year-old Emperor Akihito abdicates on April 30 — an exceedingly rare event for this ancient monarchy. Can his son, Prince Naruhito, give Japan's royal family a modern makeover?
Worldwide, 1 in 10 presidents and prime ministers has relatives who were already in politics. Europe and Latin America, both democratic regions, have the highest proportion of leaders who come from political families. Shutterstock

Dynasties still run the world

To reach the highest rungs of power, a new study shows, it really helps if your dad was president.
There were 84 women in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2018 - and there are 106 in 2019. Office of Nancy Pelosi

How many women does it take to change a broken Congress?

Research shows that women work more collaboratively than men in groups and create more inclusive solutions to thorny problems. More women in Washington could bridge America's yawning partisan divide.
California’s Katie Porter, seen here with Democratic candidates and former president Barack Obama, is one of just three first-time female congressional candidates in California. AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu

Female candidates running in record numbers for the midterms — just not in California

A record number of women are poised to win public office in 2018. But don't look to California for help shifting the gender balance in Congress during the 'year of the woman.'
Black women in Brazil protest presidential frontrunner Jair Bolsonaro, who is known for his disparaging remarks about women, on Sept. 29, 2018. AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo

Sexism, racism drive more black women to run for office in both Brazil and US

In Brazil, a record 1,237 black women will stand for office in Sunday's general election. As in the US, their campaigns reflect deep personal concern about rising racism and sexism in politics.
Public outrage followed the 2012 gang rape of a 23-year-old woman on a bus in Delhi, India. Here, demonstrators call for justice at the one-year anniversary of the incident. Reuters/Anindito Mukherjee

India has a sexual assault problem that only women can fix

India is the most dangerous country for women in 2018, according to a new survey. Putting more women in government is a necessary first step in preventing rape and better protecting abuse survivors.
Some 200,000 Argentinean women marched on March 8 for International Women’s Day. Many proclaimed their support for legalizing abortion. AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta

Argentina’s abortion legalization debate ignites soul searching on women’s rights

A new bill that would legalize abortion in Argentina has spurred surprise debate on the gender pay gap, parental leave and political representation. Will Argentinean women finally get their due?
Women face myriad barriers running for office and it’s time to knock down those obstacles starting at the municipal level. In this November 2017 photo, Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland sits between Maryam Monsef, Minister of Status of Women, right, and Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie. (The Canadian Press/Sean Kilpatrick)

How to ensure more women run for public office

Canadian women are under-represented in politics and are hesitant to run for office for myriad reasons. Here's what needs to be done, especially at the municipal level, to get more women in office.

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