Articles on Dietary guidelines

Displaying all articles

Evidence supports a review of dietary guidelines around the ideal balance of omega 6 to omega 3 dietary fats. Shutterstock/Uber Images

Why Australian dietary recommendations on fat need to change

A prominent new paper reflects growing global sentiment amongst scientists and dieticians to review advice relating to the types of dietary fats we should consume for optimal health.
The main thrust of the advisory committee’s report is that diets should be focused on whole foods, not specific nutrients. U.S. Department of Agriculture/Flickr

Expert is as expert does: in defence of US dietary guidelines

National dietary guidelines have become an easy target for those looking for a scapegoat for bad diets in rich countries. And a BMJ article about draft US guidelines adds further fuel for the fire.
Any improvements you can make to what you eat and drink will help stack the odds in your favour. Image Point Fr/Shutterstock

Health Check: five food tips that could save your life after a heart attack

Every ten minutes in Australia someone has a heart attack. For 17% this will be fatal; the rest get a second chance. If you have had a close call, these five food tips will help get your health back on…
Your mum was right: it’s good for you to eat your veggies. Yet a recent survey found one in four Australians ate none in a typical day. shashinjutsu/Flickr

Healthy diet, healthier planet

The way we currently produce food around the world contributes up to 20-30% of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions and accounts for 70% of all human water use. But is it possible to eat well and take…
Find a healthy eating regime you can stick to. foshydog/Flickr

Health Check: what’s the best diet for weight loss?

When it comes to weight loss, there are no magic tricks that guarantee success. What works for you is likely to be different to what works for your partner, neighbour or workmate. The best advice is to…
The World Health Organisation is considering halving its recommendation that sugars make up 10% of your diet. Flickr/happy via

Sweet enough? Separating fact from fiction in the sugar debate

Forget lemon detox diets and soup fasts, sugar-free was the fad diet choice of 2013. But while it’s wise to limit the foods and drinks you consume that contain added sugars, this doesn’t mean you need…
Processed meats and large quantities of cooked red meats (more than 500g a week) increase your risk of bowel cancer. Flickr/Pabo76

Health Check: does processed meat cause bowel cancer?

Each year around 14,400 Australians are diagnosed with bowel (colon and rectal) cancer. It’s the second most common newly diagnosed cancer after lung cancer and claims around 3,980 lives a year. The good…
Juicing reduces the fibre content of fruit and vegetables but it’s better than not eating them at all. Adam Franco

Health Check: the low-down on eating vs juicing fruit and veg

Today we launch Health Check, an ongoing series which injects scientific evidence into popular health discussions. Stay tuned for a new Health Check each Monday afternoon. Eating more fruits and vegetables…
Forget feeling guilty and do something: parents can help kids learn healthier habits. www.shutterstock.com/Aleksei Potov

Guilt relief: how families can fight childhood obesity

As a dietitian and nutritionist for more than 15 years, the most common emotion I encounter in parents is guilt. And it’s little wonder - if you’re an Australian parent, you have a one-in-four chance of…
Serving suggestion: just don’t eat too much. PA/Matthew Fearn

Some food will always get a red light (but we can still eat it)

Olive oil producers and other European food industry members have said they’re concerned about the UK’s traffic-light food labelling system because their products would be labelled as unhealthy. But nutrition…
‘Light’ wines are potentially big business if they can be successfully marketed to the diet-conscious consumer. Steve Petric

‘Light’ wine: good for your waistline or just producers’ bottom line?

Dieters can now have their wine and drink it, guilt-free and minus the hangover. That’s the promise of so-called “light” or low-alcohol, low-calorie wines. But these wines are not considerably lighter…

Top contributors

More