Australian Bureau of Meteorology

The Bureau of Meteorology is Australia’s national weather, climate and water agency. Its expertise and services assist Australians in dealing with the harsh realities of their natural environment, including drought, floods, fires, storms, tsunami and tropical cyclones. Through regular forecasts, warnings, monitoring and advice spanning the Australian region and Antarctic territory, the Bureau provides one of the most fundamental and widely used services of government.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 55 articles

Frost affected many crops across WA during September 2016. WA Department of Primary Industry and Regional Development

Not just heat: even our spring frosts can bear the fingerprint of climate change

We already know that climate change makes heatwaves hotter and longer. But a new series of research papers asks whether there is also a climate fingerprint on frosty spells and bouts of wet weather.
Knowing about hailstones in advance would be preferable. AAP Image/Dan Peled

All hail new weather radar technology, which can spot hailstones lurking in thunderstorms

New "dual-pol" weather radars promise to spot large hailstones forming inside thunderstorms, giving people a heads-up when it's about to hail.
Climate change is already delivering more extremes of wet and dry to the Pacific region. EPA/FRANCIS R. MALASIG

Droughts and flooding rains already more likely as climate change plays havoc with Pacific weather

New research shows that global warming has already begun to exacerbate extremes of rainfall in the Pacific region – with more to come.
Wildfires in Tasmania in 2016 were in part the result of an extended dry period beginning in 2015. Rob Blakers

Climate change played a role in Australia’s hottest October and Tasmania’s big dry in 2015

October 2015 was the hottest on record for that month, and Tasmania had its driest ever spring.
After the storm … Researchers are working together to predict future outbreaks of thunderstorm asthma. from www.shutterstock.com

Keeping one step ahead of pollen triggers for thunderstorm asthma

Researchers from a range of disciplines need to work together if we are to predict and prepare for the next thunderstorm asthma event.
Nice weather if you’re into skiing, or being really cold. AAP Image/Progressive PR, Mount Buller Ski Resort, Andrew Railton

Is the tropical Indian Ocean to blame for southern Australia’s wet winter?

The Indian Ocean Dipole may be El Nino's less famous cousin, but that hasn't stopped it having a profound effect on Australia's weather since it flipped into a "strong negative phase" two months ago.
Australia’s mountains may be small but each year they deliver enough snow for winter sports. Andrew Watkins

When is it going to snow? Getting a fix on what can make a good season

Australia's snow season is notoriously fickle - so what determines whether we'll get a good fall?
Rural southern Australia has been drying out over the past several decades. Pictured here, Burra in South Australia. David Jones

Hasta la vista El Niño – but don’t hold out for ‘normal’ weather just yet

Australia is the land of drought of flooding rains, driven by events such as El Nino. But despite this variability, some parts of Australia are clearly drying out.
A hot end of the year contributed to Christmas Day fires in Victoria. AAP Image/Keith Pakenham

Australia’s climate in 2015: cool to start with a hot finish

El Niño dominated global climate in 2015, but in Australia the story was more complicated. 2015 was Australia's fifth warmest year on record, and saw the return of very dry conditions to parts of Australia.
Despite a decade of drought and declining rainfall in parts of Australia, there’s still plenty of water to go around. Maroondah reservoir from www.shutterstock.com

Declining rainfall in parts of Australia, but still plenty of water available: BOM report

The Millennium Drought ended more than five years ago, but several years of below-average rainfall and El Niño have brought drought back to many parts of Australia. Our latest report on water in Australia shows rainfall is continuing to decline in eastern Australia and increase in the north.

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