National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research

NIWA, the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, is a Crown Research Institute established in 1992. It operates as a stand-alone company with its own Board of Directors and Executive.

What is a Crown Research Institute?

Crown Research Institutes (CRIs) are Crown-owned companies established to undertake scientific research and related activities in accordance with the Crown Research Institutes Act 1992. The Shareholding Ministers are the Minister of Finance (50%), and the Minister of Research, Science & Technology (50%). CRIs are subject to the Crown Entities Act 2004, the Crown Research Institutes Act 1992, and the Companies Act 1993.

Key requirements on CRIs include:

Carrying out research for the benefit of New Zealand Pursuing excellence Abiding by ethical standards Recognising social responsibility Operating as a good employer Maintaining financial viability Producing an Annual Report, which is tabled in Parliament

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A boy plays cricket among smoke in Karachi. Deaths from air pollution across the globe will increase as climate change accelerates. REUTERS/Akhtar Soomro

Climate change set to increase air pollution deaths by hundreds of thousands by 2100

A new study suggests climate change will cause changes to patterns of ground-level ozone and smog – two deadly pollutants set to increase deaths by about 260,000 worldwide by the end of the century.
Tasman Lake, which is fed by melt water from the retreating Tasman Glacier, photographed in March this year. Trevor Chinn

New Zealand’s Southern Alps have lost a third of their ice

A third of the permanent snow and ice of New Zealand’s Southern Alps has now disappeared, according to our new research based on National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research aerial surveys. Since…
Reduced ozone means increased UV radiation, and that leads to skin cancer. Tracey Lawson

Saving the ozone layer saved human lives

SAVING THE OZONE: Part seven in our series exploring on the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer – dubbed “the world’s most successful environmental agreement” – explains how the…

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