Texas A&M University

Texas A&M is the state’s oldest public university and largest university, and one of the largest in the nation: a research-intensive, land-grant institution with 68,400 students, including 14,900 in graduate or professional school. Students choose from more than 130 undergraduate and 240 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools, and participate in more than 1,100 student-run organizations and activities (including the Big Event, the largest one-day, student-run service project in the United States).

Texas A&M ranks sixteenth nationally in research expenditures, with more than $892 in FY2016 (National Science Foundation), and is a member of the Association of American Universities. Texas A&M ranks at or near the top among universities nationally in the areas of academic excellence, value, and affordability; on-time student graduation rates (both overall and for minorities); student engagement and happiness; and students who graduate with less college-related debt and become the nation’s highest-earning graduates. Texas A&M also is tied for having the most graduates serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.

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After the Civil War, Texas’s sugar cane plantations were still farmed by unpaid black laborers – prisoners forced to work for free in a system called ‘convict leasing.’

A Texas city discovered a mass grave of prison laborers. What should it do with the bodies?

An African-American burial ground uncovered at a construction site in Texas has ignited debate on how to protect black history as suburban sprawl overtakes rural areas once farmed by enslaved workers.
Un niño que sufrió una cortada con papel. Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock.com

¿Por qué duelen tanto las cortadas con papel?

Todos hemos sufrido una cortada con papel por lo menos una vez en la vida. ¿Alguna vez se ha preguntado por qué duelen tanto estas lesiones menores? Un médico de familia explica las razones.
A boy with a paper cut. Suzanne Tucker/Shutterstock.com

Why do paper cuts hurt so much?

Ouch! Who hasn't felt the effects of a paper cut and then cursed the gods or themselves for the injury? But have you ever wondered why they hurt so much? A professor of family medicine explains why.
Just like teenagers, robot drivers need lots of practice. iurii/Shutterstock.com

Even self-driving cars need driver education

Autonomous cars need to learn how to drive just like people do: with real-world practice on public roads. It's key to safety, and to public confidence in the new technologies.
Vaccinations have saved countless lives and untold suffering, even though many adults still believe vaccines are bad for their children. Africa Studios/Shutterstock.com

Why vaccine opponents think they know more than medical experts

Vaccines have long been considered safe, but many people still believe they are not. A new study shows that people who think they know more than medical experts are more likely to believe that vaccine are not safe.
People ages 50-64 begin to develop chronic conditions for which they need coverage. Doing away with insurance for pre-existing conditions puts this group at risk. Syda Productions/Shutterstock.com

Pre-existing conditions: The age group most vulnerable if coverage goes away

Stripping away preexisting conditions coverage would have far-reaching effects, but 50- to 64-year-olds are most vulnerable. Ignoring medical issues at that age could mean sicker oldsters later on.
A healing garden at Mayo Clinic in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. Mayo Clinic Health System

How to build a better, safer, more welcoming hospital

Hospitals have been designed throughout the years to be functional. But for patients, that often means cold and scary. Two experts share findings that more pleasing environments could be good for patients.
Hurricane Harvey approaching the Texas Gulf Coast in August 2017. NOAA/Handout via Reuters

3 reasons why the US is vulnerable to big disasters

Large-scale emergencies can be a strain, even in one of the world's richest countries. Population growth, income inequality and fragile supply chains may make the problem worse.
Immigration proceedings look a lot like criminal trials, with immigrants often brought in handcuffed. Reuters/Reade Levinson

How immigration court works

The attorney general can decide immigration cases because immigration courts are part of the DOJ, not the judiciary. This congested system has 345,000 open cases. Most will likely end in deportation.
Mission specialist Sally Ride became the first American woman to fly in space. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Astronaut Sally K. Ride’s legacy – encouraging young women to embrace science and engineering

35 years ago Sally Ride became the first American woman in space. But rather than focus on her own extraordinary achievements, her passion became boosting the number of girls pursuing STEM. Another pioneering astronaut remembers her friend and colleague.
Will and Grace are out of retirement – along with a host of other TV characters. Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

Why did the television reboot become all the rage?

'Will & Grace,' 'The X-Files,' 'Fuller House,' 'Arrested Development' – the list goes on. If we're in the midst of a TV renaissance, why are networks and their viewers looking to the past?
Cancer care for adults could be improved if caregivers provided the empathy they provide to children, the authors suggest. ESB Professional/Shutterstock.com

How lessons from childhood cancer care could improve adult cancer care

Pediatric cancer is one of the cruelest of diseases, and caregivers develop special skills to help their patients. Research shows that caregivers for adults could learn some things from them.

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