Texas A&M University

Texas A&M is the state’s oldest public university and largest university, and one of the largest in the nation: a research-intensive, land-grant institution with 68,400 students, including 14,900 in graduate or professional school. Students choose from more than 130 undergraduate and 240 graduate degree programs in 16 colleges and schools, and participate in more than 1,100 student-run organizations and activities (including the Big Event, the largest one-day, student-run service project in the United States).

Texas A&M ranks sixteenth nationally in research expenditures, with more than $892 in FY2016 (National Science Foundation), and is a member of the Association of American Universities. Texas A&M ranks at or near the top among universities nationally in the areas of academic excellence, value, and affordability; on-time student graduation rates (both overall and for minorities); student engagement and happiness; and students who graduate with less college-related debt and become the nation’s highest-earning graduates. Texas A&M also is tied for having the most graduates serving as CEOs of Fortune 500 companies.

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‘I don’t care what they say about me,’ P.T. Barnum once said, ‘as long as they spell my name correctly.’ Everett Historical/Shutterstock.com

How the ‘Greatest Showman’ paved the way for Donald Trump

The new movie about P.T. Barnum couldn’t come at a better time: It's impossible not to see his ghost in our culture, in our advertisements and in our president.
When self-driving cars get in crashes, who’s to blame? Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority via AP

Redefining ‘safety’ for self-driving cars

If autonomous vehicles are going to be safer than human drivers, they'll need to improve their ability to perceive and understand their surroundings – and become the ultimate defensive drivers.
Fracking has led to an increase in truck traffic, one of the reasons for worsening trends on air quality in areas with oil and gas drilling. AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

How has the US fracking boom affected air pollution in shale areas?

The fracking boom has led to a large increase of hydrocarbon emissions in rural areas, reversing some regional air toxics trends.
Pres. Trump shows off an executive order he signed Oct. 12, 2017 to undo parts of the Affordable Care Act. AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Will Obamacare marketplaces suffer as open enrollment begins?

Frustrated with Congress for its failure to replace Obamacare, President Trump took matters into his own hands and issued an executive order to nix parts of it. How his order will play out is unknown.
Crews clean up debris in a neighborhood flooded by Hurricane Harvey in Beaumont, Texas, Sept. 26, 2017. AP Photo/David Goldman

Scientist at work: Measuring public health impacts after disasters

Epidemiologists study disease outbreaks in populations to determine who gets sick and why. In the wake of this year's hurricanes, they are assessing impacts from mold, toxic leaks and other threats.
Workers clear debris on Sept. 25, 2017 from the top of a building that collapsed in Mexico City after the Sept. 19 earthquake. AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Mexico’s road to recovery after quakes is far longer than it looks

Natural disasters are not only bad in the short term. Many families will see their health, well-being and ability to escape poverty affected for decades, and some will be affected for life.
Aedes Aegypti mosquitoes viewed through a microscope in Broward County, Florida, in June 2016. AP Photo/Lynne Sladky

Harvey and Irma present nearly perfect conditions for Zika-spreading mosquitoes

Vast amounts of standing water in Houston and other hurricane-flooded areas are dangerous not only because of toxins. The water is a dangerous breeding ground for mosquitoes that transmit Zika.
Cars leaving Beaumont, Texas during a mandatory evacuation before the arrival of Hurricane Gustav, August 30, 2008. Patsy Lynch/FEMA

Why Texans heard conflicting messages about evacuating ahead of Hurricane Harvey

Why did some Texas coastal cities order mandatory evacuations ahead of Hurricane Harvey while others, including Houston, did not? There is no formula for these decisions; either choice can backfire.
How will we react when cars start driving themselves? Patramansky Oleg/Shutterstock.com

Self-driving cars are coming – but are we ready?

How might we, and our nation's roads and highways, need to change as autonomous vehicles become more ubiquitous? We know a lot of the answers, but not all of them.
When a man was diagnosed with Ebola in Dallas in 2014, workers cleared out the apartment unit where he had been staying. Reuters/Jim Young

How Trump’s global health budget endangers Americans

President Trump wants to slash global health funding at a time when more investment is needed, not less. This spending can protect Americans – as well as foreigners – from deadly diseases.

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