University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is a public, coeducational research university in Eugene, Oregon, United States. UO was founded in 1876 and graduated its first class two years later.

The Carnegie Foundation classifies the University of Oregon as a Tier 1 RU/VH (very high research activity) university. It is one of 108 universities to have such a designation. Additionally, the UO is one of only two Association of American Universities members in the Pacific Northwest.

As a flagship university of the Oregon University System, the UO is one of the nation’s many public teaching and research universities. As of Fall 2012, UO offers 269 degree programs, including highly nationally-ranked graduate programs in Biology, Business, Education, Environmental Law, Geological Sciences, Physics, Psychology, Sports Marketing, and Sustainable Design.

As of March 2012, University of Oregon faculty and alumni include two Nobel Prize recipients, 10 Pulitzer Prize winners, 19 Rhodes scholars, four Marshall scholars, 58 Guggenheim Fellows, and 129 Fulbright scholars.

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The emotion of lassitude might help your body fight off infection by making certain adjustments. Kalinka Georgieva/Shutterstock.com

Feeling sick is an emotion meant to help you get better faster

Fighting off infection comes with predictable psychological and behavioral features. Now researchers suggest an emotion coordinates this response to help you get better. They call it 'lassitude.'
The Maria Fire billows above Santa Paula, California on Oct. 31. AP/Noah Berger

California is living America’s dystopian future

'California is America fast-forward,' writes one scholar. Does that mean that the dystopian infernos that have consumed parts of the state are simply a picture of what awaits the rest of America?
Aja Conrad, the Karuk Tribe’s workforce and internships coordinator, lights a prescribed fire in Orleans, California. Jenny Staats

What western states can learn from Native American wildfire management strategies

Instead of suppressing wildfire, the Karuk Tribe in the Pacific Northwest is using it as an integral part of its climate change management plan. Federal, state and local agencies are taking note.

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