University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

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A coyote cools off in the shade of a leafy suburb. Wildlife interactions with pets and humans can transfer disease, including the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. (Winston Wong/flickr)

If your pet has this tapeworm, it could kill you

A parasite found in coyotes, wolves and foxes is now spreading to dogs and their owners as its range expands across Canada.
Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Scientists believe flight may influence their immune responses to coronoviruses, which cause fatal diseases such as SARS and MERS in humans. (Shutterstock)

Can bats help humans survive the next pandemic?

Scientific studies show that bats may carry "coronoviruses" causing SARS and MERS - without showing symptoms of disease. Could the bat immune system be key to human survival in future pandemics?
An infection prevention and control professional wipes her gloves with a bleach wipe during an ebola virus training in Ottawa. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Explainer: How we all benefit from the public health system

Infectious diseases pose a continual threat to Canadians. Ensuring the population stays healthy requires increasing investment in our public health system.
The Chalk River Laboratories in 2012. Canada’s role as a world leader in neutron-scattering is at risk because of a failure to invest in infrastructure renewal at the facility. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Why Canada must not be shut out of the neutron technology it invented

Canada is a world leader in the field of neutron scattering, winning a Nobel Prize in 1994 for its invention. But the looming shutdown of facilities at Chalk River puts us on the sidelines.
Egg donors, sperm donors and surrogates are critical participants and patients in the use of reproductive technologies - so why are their rights and heath repeatedly overlooked? (Shutterstock)

Egg donors and surrogates need high-quality care

Health Canada is drafting important regulations for assisted reproductive technologies. Initial documents treat egg donors and surrogates as little more than spare parts and walking wombs.
Surgeons at the University of Saskatchewan use a 3D printed human brain to plan complex neurosurgical procedures for patients with movement disorders.

3D printers: A revolutionary frontier for medicine

From cheap prosthetic arms for landmine victims in Sudan to the promise of surgery on astronauts in space — 3D printing is sparking a healthcare revolution.
In an ideal world of gender equality and recognition for women’s work, surrogacy could perhaps be part of a paid, legitimate economy. (Camila Cordeiro on Unsplash)

When women are surrogate mothers: Is that work?

As the Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society urges the government to consider "compensation" for surrogacy, we need to talk about the implications of this rhetoric for women.
A virus like SARS can shut down cytokine production, enabling it to multiply to higher levels and causing significant infection and even death. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer)

Explainer: How the human body first fights off pathogens

We've all endured infections. Here's how it works when our bodies are attacked by viruses, bacteria or parasites, and our innate immune system becomes the first line of defence.
Two women walk in front of a billboard, which says “Ebola must go. Stopping Ebola is Everybody’s Business” in Monrovia, Liberia, January 15 2015. UNMEER/Emmanuel Tobey

The Ebola outbreak highlights shortcomings in disease surveillance and response – and where we can do better

Along with better strategies to respond to outbreaks in human populations, we need a stronger focus on surveillance in animals to identify infectious diseases before they pose a risk to human health.
In this photo a researcher from the virology institute at the Bonn Faculty of Medicine looks at cell cultures. Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters

Explainer: what exactly is coronavirus?

If you’ve never heard of coronaviruses before, you may know about some of the illnesses different types of they can cause, like SARS, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome and the common cold.
To understand public heath, you have to understand how the public lives. Commuters via STH/Shutterstock

To tackle inequalities, build health into all public policies

Many of today’s public health issues – diabetes, cancer, obesity, cardiovascular disease – are strongly associated with social inequalities. Literature from across the world shows that gaps in income…
Different viruses have different incubation periods so some make you ill sooner than others. MIKI Yoshihito/Flickr

Viral incubation: why do bugs hide before they strike?

Health workers returning to their home countries after working in Ebola-affected areas are being asked to place themselves in quarantine for 21 days. This period is important because it’s the maximum time…

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