University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 39 articles

Snowshoe hares near the now closed Giant Mine outside of Yellowknife, N.W.T show signs of arsenic contamination. (Denali NPS/flickr)

Toxic leftovers from Giant Mine found in snowshoe hares

Historical gold mining at the Giant Mine near Yellowknife, N.W.T. released toxic arsenic into the environment. Snowshoe hares are showing signs of poisoning.
A aerial view of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain marine terminal, in Burnaby, B.C., is shown on Tues., May 29, 2018. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada’s Paris-pipeline paradox

Canada wants to move towards a green economy and meet its Paris Agreement targets, but it has also just taken ownership of a pipeline. How can the federal government deal with this paradox?
People listen during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on May 29, 2018. The federal government’s decision to buy the project doesn’t inspire confidence for potential investors eyeing Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

What the Kinder Morgan decision says about investing in Canada

The decision of the Canadian government to purchase the $4.5 billion Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project doesn't exactly instil confidence in Canada's investment climate.
Health workers get ready to spray insecticide in advance of the 2016 Summer Olympics, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to combat the mosquitoes that transmit the Zika virus in this Jan. 26, 2016 photo. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)

Viruses can cause global pandemics, but where did the first virus come from?

Recent discoveries of ancient viruses are helping scientists understand their origins.
Tabletop games have been around for more than a century. Early North American game makers often depicted Indigenous people as savage enemies.

The hidden history of Indigenous stereotypes in tabletop games

For more than a century, board games have provided children with some of their first exposure to Indigenous stereotypes — hidden behind ornate lithographs, painted cubes and punched cardboard.
Boat noise can interfere with the underwater communication of fishes and other marine animals. Unsplash

The fishy problem of underwater noise pollution

The noise from motor boats, sonar and other industrial activity interferes with the underwater chatter of fishes.
A Canadian politician has announced he plans to introduce a private member’s bill to remove the legal prohibitions on payments to surrogate mothers and to sperm and egg donors. (Shutterstock)

Paying surrogates, sperm and egg donors goes against Canadian values

There are sound ethical reasons behind Canada's decision to ban payment to surrogate mothers and sperm and egg donors in 2004. A new push to remove the restrictions ignores the risks.
In Mozambique, gender-based violence, early marriage and early pregnancy all play a part in compromising the health of mothers and infants. (Nazeem Muhajarine)

New research partnership makes childbirth safer in Mozambique

Mozambique has one of the highest maternal death rates in the world. Researchers hope to reduce this, with an ambitious project aimed at empowering women and girls.
Donald Trump doesn’t liked to be reined in, which is why he has such a problem with trade deals like NAFTA. (The Associated Press)

New NAFTA or no NAFTA? How Trump’s ire could affect Canadian agri-food

Part of the purpose of trade deals is to prevent politicians from inserting politics into matters of commerce. Donald Trump is bucking that trend. What does it mean for Canada and NAFTA?
Exercise is recommended as an effective non-opioid strategy for non-cancer pain such as fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. Yet most adults living with chronic pain do not exercise. Or they exercise very little. (Shutterstock)

How exercise can help tackle the opioid crisis

Research shows that exercise offers promise -- as an alternative to prescription opioids -- for relieving chronic pain.
Social media has become a place of vitriolic myths about Indigenous peoples in the wake of the Gerald Stanley trial for the killing of Colten Boushie. Here, a vigil in support of Colten Boushie’s family on Feb. 13, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Social media full of vitriolic myths in the aftermath of the Stanley trial

Social media posts since Gerald Stanley’s acquittal have been saturated with vitriolic rants and myths. If reconciliation is to be more than an aspiration, settlers must acknowledge our culpability.
Miniature of the duke of true love and his companions entertaining ladies. The Book of the Queen, c. 1410–1414, France (Paris), Harley 4431, f. 145 (Creative Commons)

The magic of love and sex

A scholar of medieval magic discusses the hope in magical techniques for finding love.
Canada’s Andi Naude, who came into the Olympics ranked No. 2 in the world in women’s mogul skiing, reacts after failing to complete her final run at the 2018 Winter Olympic Games. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

The agony of defeat: How Olympians can deal with failure

Failure is something all athletes need to deal with, especially when competing on the world stage that is the Olympics. Learning self-compassion can help athletes rebound from setbacks.
Jean Chretien, then Canada’s attorney general, signs the proclamation repatriating Canada’s constitution while Queen Elizabeth II watches in Ottawa in April 1982. The Constitution includes Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the notwithstanding clause that allows provinces to opt out of adhering to the Charter. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ron Poling

The sparse use of Canada’s notwithstanding clause

The notwithstanding clause in Canada's Charter of Rights and Freedoms has seldom been used. But it's not totally gathering dust, and Quebec is hinting it might use it to defend its niqab law.
Protesters kick in the window at Concordia University as they try to stop a speech by former Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Montreal in 2002. Netanyahu cancelled the speech citing security concerns. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Freedom of expression is under attack at our universities

In his new book "University Commons Divided," former University of Saskatchewan President Peter MacKinnon examines the attack on freedom of expression at Canadian universities.
A coyote cools off in the shade of a leafy suburb. Wildlife interactions with pets and humans can transfer disease, including the tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. (Winston Wong/flickr)

If your pet has this tapeworm, it could kill you

A parasite found in coyotes, wolves and foxes is now spreading to dogs and their owners as its range expands across Canada.

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