University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 53 articles

Protesters opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline extension demonstrate in Vancouver in June 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Everyone needs to take a deep breath after the Trans Mountain ruling

The ruling against the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline project doesn't mean the end of the oil and gas industry in Canada. Other projects and approaches could go forward.
Parent engagement offices in ministries of education, parent engagement consultants, parent mentor programs: such measures could revolutionize schools and boost student achievement. (Shutterstock)

How parents could revolutionize education and boost results

A systematic embrace of parents' untapped knowledge by schools could revolutionize education systems in Canada and globally.
Regular exercise can go a long way towards keeping off the weight gain at college and you don’t have to be a serious athlete to participate. (Shutterstock)

How to beat the ‘freshman five’ weight gain

Research shows that young adults who don't exercise can expect an average eight kilograms of extra fat on their body by 28 years of age.
A statue of John A. Macdonald in Montreal has been repeatedly vandalized with red paint to symbolize blood. As the debate continues about removing statues, what specific actions are needed to promote reconciliation? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Reconciliation requires more than symbolic gestures

Removing statues of historical figures may be important symbolic statements when it comes to reconciliation, but action on important Indigenous issues like land claims and education are needed more.
Scientific pursuits need to be coupled with a humanist tradition — to highlight not just how psychedelics work, but why that matters. (Shutterstock)

The real promise of LSD, MDMA and mushrooms for medical science

Once associated with mind-control experiments and counter-cultural defiance, psychedelics now show great promise for mental health treatments and may prompt a re-evaluation of the scientific method.
The decision by the city of Victoria to take down a statue of John A. Macdonald has renewed debate about how historical figures should be remembered. This photo from 2015, taken at Wilfrid Laurier University, shows people protesting Macdonald’s treatment of Métis and First Nations during his time as Canada’s first prime minister. Denia Anderson

John A. Macdonald should not be forgotten, nor celebrated

Should statues of historical figures be removed or replaced? That debate has been rekindled in Canada after Victoria took down a statue of John A. Macdonald, the country's first prime minister.
Research shows that farm parents do not mindlessly expose their children to risks; rather they weigh them against the the positive impacts of involvement in the family’s agricultural heritage. (Shutterstock)

How to improve farm safety for kids

Instructing farmers to keep their kids away from farm machinery doesn't work to reduce traumatic injury. A recent research project tried listening instead.
A farmer plows a dry and dusty cotton field near Phoenix, Ariz., while a drought affects the Southwest. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

How to fight desertification and drought at home and away

Desertification is a problem of global proportions. If action isn't taken now, it will accelerate and fuel further migration and conflict.
The Canadian government recently approved the sale of genetically modified golden rice that’s fortified with Vitamin A. It’s an example of a GM food that directly benefits consumers. Josep Folta/Flickr

How to show consumers the benefits of genetically modified foods

Why are consumers so reluctant to embrace genetically modified foods? A new study suggests agricultural biotech companies are failing to show consumers a personal benefit to buying GM foods.
Snowshoe hares near the now closed Giant Mine outside of Yellowknife, N.W.T show signs of arsenic contamination. (Denali NPS/flickr)

Toxic leftovers from Giant Mine found in snowshoe hares

Historical gold mining at the Giant Mine near Yellowknife, N.W.T. released toxic arsenic into the environment. Snowshoe hares are showing signs of poisoning.
A aerial view of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain marine terminal, in Burnaby, B.C., is shown on Tues., May 29, 2018. (Jonathan Hayward/THE CANADIAN PRESS)

Canada’s Paris-pipeline paradox

Canada wants to move towards a green economy and meet its Paris Agreement targets, but it has also just taken ownership of a pipeline. How can the federal government deal with this paradox?
People listen during a protest against the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion on May 29, 2018. The federal government’s decision to buy the project doesn’t inspire confidence for potential investors eyeing Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

What the Kinder Morgan decision says about investing in Canada

The decision of the Canadian government to purchase the $4.5 billion Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project doesn't exactly instil confidence in Canada's investment climate.
Health workers get ready to spray insecticide in advance of the 2016 Summer Olympics, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to combat the mosquitoes that transmit the Zika virus in this Jan. 26, 2016 photo. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)

Viruses can cause global pandemics, but where did the first virus come from?

Recent discoveries of ancient viruses are helping scientists understand their origins.
Tabletop games have been around for more than a century. Early North American game makers often depicted Indigenous people as savage enemies.

The hidden history of Indigenous stereotypes in tabletop games

For more than a century, board games have provided children with some of their first exposure to Indigenous stereotypes — hidden behind ornate lithographs, painted cubes and punched cardboard.
Boat noise can interfere with the underwater communication of fishes and other marine animals. Unsplash

The fishy problem of underwater noise pollution

The noise from motor boats, sonar and other industrial activity interferes with the underwater chatter of fishes.

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