University of Saskatchewan

Set in an architecturally stunning century-old campus in Saskatoon, the U of S is the core of a dynamic research hub working to address critical challenges faced by people locally and around the world. World-class research centres include global institutes for food and water security, the Canadian Light Source synchrotron, the Crop Development Centre, and the Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization-International Vaccine Centre (VIDO-InterVac), plus an impressive array of national and provincial bio-science research labs. With stellar research teams and annual research income of more than $200 million, the university has earned a place among the U15 group of Canada’s top research universities.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 63 articles

The surgical removal of wisdom teeth is far more common than the problems they cause. (Pixabay)

Bad molars? The origins of wisdom teeth

When they cause problems, wisdom teeth don't seem very smart. But they may have been evolution's answer to a coarse diet.
An old Canadian law which outlaws magic fraud is about to be eliminated. This print by William Hogarth, ‘Credulity Superstition and Fanaticism,’ from 1762 epitomizes the Enlightenment view that witchcraft and religious fanaticism go hand in hand. William Hogarth/1762

Hello magic and witchcraft, goodbye Enlightenment

An antiquated Canadian law against magic and witchcraft is about to be repealed. A close look at its history reveals that it is far less superstitious than it appears.
Steve Courtoreille, chief of the Mikisew Cree First Nation, is seen on Parliament Hill in January 2013 after speaking about legal action against the federal government. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against the First Nation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

What the Supreme Court ruling means for Indigenous consultation

The headlines suggest the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled against Indigenous consultation. But its recent ruling is much more nuanced and complex than that.
A study published in the British Medical Journal Open reports that midwifery patients were 41 per cent less likely to have a small-for-gestational-age baby compared to patients of obstetricians. (Shutterstock)

Poor women who use midwives have healthier babies

New research shows that midwifery care is not just for the wealthy -- it has health and cost benefits for vulnerable women and provincial governments must act to increase their access.
The Internet of Things could improve quality of life, but it will also consume vast amounts of electricity and boost greenhouse gas emissions. (Shutterstock)

How to make computers faster and climate friendly

The Internet of Things is contributing to climate change. Innovation in computer design could help mitigate the problem.
In a research study, students with an immobilized left arm who trained their opposite wrist completely preserved both the strength and muscle volume in the left arm. (Shutterstock)

Broke your arm? Exercise the other one to strengthen it…

A research study shows that training the other limb can actually help preserve muscle in a broken and immobilized one.
Protesters opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline extension demonstrate in Vancouver in June 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Everyone needs to take a deep breath after the Trans Mountain ruling

The ruling against the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline project doesn't mean the end of the oil and gas industry in Canada. Other projects and approaches could go forward.
Parent engagement offices in ministries of education, parent engagement consultants, parent mentor programs: such measures could revolutionize schools and boost student achievement. (Shutterstock)

How parents could revolutionize education and boost results

A systematic embrace of parents' untapped knowledge by schools could revolutionize education systems in Canada and globally.
Regular exercise can go a long way towards keeping off the weight gain at college and you don’t have to be a serious athlete to participate. (Shutterstock)

How to beat the ‘freshman five’ weight gain

Research shows that young adults who don't exercise can expect an average eight kilograms of extra fat on their body by 28 years of age.
A statue of John A. Macdonald in Montreal has been repeatedly vandalized with red paint to symbolize blood. As the debate continues about removing statues, what specific actions are needed to promote reconciliation? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Reconciliation requires more than symbolic gestures

Removing statues of historical figures may be important symbolic statements when it comes to reconciliation, but action on important Indigenous issues like land claims and education are needed more.
Scientific pursuits need to be coupled with a humanist tradition — to highlight not just how psychedelics work, but why that matters. (Shutterstock)

The real promise of LSD, MDMA and mushrooms for medical science

Once associated with mind-control experiments and counter-cultural defiance, psychedelics now show great promise for mental health treatments and may prompt a re-evaluation of the scientific method.
The decision by the city of Victoria to take down a statue of John A. Macdonald has renewed debate about how historical figures should be remembered. This photo from 2015, taken at Wilfrid Laurier University, shows people protesting Macdonald’s treatment of Métis and First Nations during his time as Canada’s first prime minister. Denia Anderson

John A. Macdonald should not be forgotten, nor celebrated

Should statues of historical figures be removed or replaced? That debate has been rekindled in Canada after Victoria took down a statue of John A. Macdonald, the country's first prime minister.
Research shows that farm parents do not mindlessly expose their children to risks; rather they weigh them against the the positive impacts of involvement in the family’s agricultural heritage. (Shutterstock)

How to improve farm safety for kids

Instructing farmers to keep their kids away from farm machinery doesn't work to reduce traumatic injury. A recent research project tried listening instead.

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