University of South Australia

Founded in 1991, the University of South Australia is committed to educating professionals, creating and applying knowledge, engaging communities, maintaining cultural diversity among its staff and students, and providing equitable access to education.

Links

articles 1 to 20 of 176

The standard of proof that applies in different types of judicial proceedings may result in quite different verdicts. Shutterstock/Andrey Popov

Judge suspects but must acquit man on child pornography charges

After saying he was 'deeply suspicious', a judge cleared a man of child pornography offences. We need to understand the standard of proof to make sense of verdicts, including AFL rulings on doping.
Cold and flu tablets won’t cure a cold. Flood G./Flickr

The low-down on ‘cold and flu’ tablets

Pharmacies have aisles full of cold and flu tablets. But which product is the best one for you? And will it really help you feel better?
Your pain is in fact produced in your head and it will produce it more readily and more intensely if you have what you think is clear evidence that something is wrong. Mislav Marohnić/Flickr

No brain, no pain: it is in the mind, so test results can make it worse

People develop a long-term problem after an episode of back pain if they expect to not recover. Steps by the medical sector to avoid catatrophising back pain by not suggesting scans will help.
Researchers are turning their attention to what makes creativity work in organisations. Sebastiaan ter Burg

Creativity in the workplace: what we know and what we do

Creativity is credited with providing the capability for organisations to generate unique intellectual property, unique methods and processes – so how is it generated and promoted?
Researchers appear to be stuck in a tug-of-war over the causes of the current levels of obesity. lee roberts/Flickr

Obesity wars revisited: is it the meat or the motion?

Obesity researchers have been in a tug of war about obesity for decades now. So what does the evidence show about the latest offensive in the obesity wars?
Keytruda® targets a protein on the surface of immune cells that stopped them from attacking the melanoma cells. Australis Photography/Shutterstock

Explainer: how does Keytruda treat melanoma and why is it so costly?

Keytruda® is the latest drug to be registered in Australia for the treatment of widespread melanoma. But we must wait to see if it meets the cost-effectiveness targets for PBS subsidisation.
Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the spiritual and political head of IS, is a clever theologian and Qur’anic artisan. EPA/Islamic State Video

Believe it or not, we could actually learn something from Islamic State

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the spiritual and political head of IS, is a clever theologian and Qur’anic artisan. We would do well to better our own interfaith theological understanding.
International students provide universities with a large chunk of their revenue - but at what cost? Faungg/Flickr

Australian unis should take responsibility for corrupt practices in international education

A new report from the NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption says Australian universities have become increasingly reliant on income from fee-paying international students, and is letting academic standards slide for the valuable income stream.
Australia has a long history of world class science, but a national science strategy will help boost engagement with industry. Steve Dorman/Flickr

Why a national science strategy is good for Australia

The government's announcement of a national science strategy is good for Australia, particularly for promoting engagement between science and industry.
More than two decades after the World Medical Association called for a ban on boxing, knocking a person senseless is still condoned, even celebrated. EPA/Christian Charisius

Why boxing and cage fighting should be banned – but won’t be

The death of a 23-year-old boxer and the lifting of cage-fighting bans in every state but Western Australia raise the question of why we allow violence that would be criminal outside a ring or cage.
The importance of data and “just-in-time” decision-making may mean the background of CEOs could change. Image sourced from www.shutterstock.com

Is CIO the new route to chief executive’s suite?

Finance backgrounds have traditionally been the preferred skills for an aspiring chief executive. But in the age of Big Data, that may be changing.
Julie Atlas Muz and Mat Fraser star in Beauty and the Beast, currently playing at the Adelaide Festival. Bronwen Sharp/Adelaide Festival of Arts

Beauty and the Beast promises and fails at the Adelaide Festival

The devised performance text of Beauty and the Beast at the Adelaide Festival promises to highlight concerns related to disability and societal taboos – but falls short of a world-class standard.
We bailed out the banks – our food is worth even more, but working out exactly how much more is tricky. Louise Docker/Wikimedia Commons

If dollars rule the world, why don’t the bees get a bailout?

Is it worth trying to put a price on the natural world, when things like water and food are priceless? Yes, says Paul Sutton - without knowing the value of the environment, we might not value it at all.
Doctors recommend drugs and surgery for most diseases but exercise may actually be a better answer for obesity. Ben Bradshaw/Flickr

Even if obesity were a disease, exercise may be too bitter a pill

Most of us know that obesity is a growing problem across the globe but would you call it a disease? While it may seem like a semantic debate, it is actually a serious issue with major implications.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors