University of South Australia

Founded in 1991, the University of South Australia is committed to educating professionals, creating and applying knowledge, engaging communities, maintaining cultural diversity among its staff and students, and providing equitable access to education.


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There are still barriers to overcome to keep more women in science. CIAT/Flickr

What it’s like to be a woman working in science, and how to make it better

What is it like to be a woman working in the sciences? While there are hurdles to overcome, there are joys as well. The new SAGE initiative hopes to make STEM even more amenable to women.
Workplaces should try to eliminate situations where bullying can occur, rather than put responsibility on workers to behave nicely.

Like a ‘cancer’ of the workplace, bullying is a symptom of dysfunction

Like cancer, bullying will affect a majority of employees during their working lives, as a victim, witness, or perhaps as the alleged bully. And like cancer, there's no silver bullet to cure bullying.
Off-label use is when an approved medicine is prescribed for a different reason, at a different dose, or in different patient groups than originally intended. Benny Lin/Flickr

Explainer: why are off-label medicines prescribed?

The off-label use of medicines is not illegal and it doesn't mean regulators have specifically "disapproved" its use. But there are a number of issues to consider before using a medicine off-label.
Should parents be allowed to select the sex of their child through IVF when there’s no compelling medical reason to do so? Marcus Hansson/Fkickr

Why we should consider whether it’s time to allow sex selection in IVF: NHMRC

The National Health and Medical Research Council call for public submissions on whether sex selection should be allowed without a medical reason recognises changing social attitudes.
We’re more likely to recall memories and information we’ve used frequently rather than those obtained at a particular age. Kristo-Gothard Hunor/Shutterstock

Passage of time: why people with dementia switch back to the past

People with dementia judge the passage of time differently, and can access remote memories from many decades ago while being unable to remember events of the past few hours.
Detecting viruses in wild-caught mosquitoes provides intimate detail of disease transmission cycles. University of Washington SPH/Flickr

How a new test is revolutionising what we know about viruses in our midst

We monitor mosquitoes to help predict and control virus outbreaks. And a new technique for collecting mosquito saliva from the field has made the process both more sensitive and inexpensive.
The physical and mental health benefits associated with moving, being active and mindful are not just limited to yoga. Robert Kneschke/Shutterstock

Yoga may be the missing link to stroke survivors' rehabilitation

One in six Australians will have a stroke in their lifetime. That's about 51,000 strokes per year, or one every ten minutes.
Questions are being asked about why Man Haron Monis was free on bail, but a witch-hunt is unlikely to improve the process of deciding when to keep an accused person in custody. AAP/Dean Lewins

When bail causes outrage, don’t just blame the courts

The spotlight is on a 2013 decision to grant bail to Man Haron Monis, the man responsible for the Lindt Cafe siege a year later. It must be hoped risk-averse politicians can avoid knee-jerk responses.
Prime Minister Najib Razak is at the centre of a scandal over investigations into the origins of US$700 million transferred into his bank account. Reuters/Olivia Harris

Malaysia in turmoil as PM focuses on survival

Najib Razak's response to corruption allegations has been a crackdown on investigators and his critics on both sides of politics. Malaysians are left wondering where their nation is headed.
The burden of creating a more inclusive, fairer and more tolerant society is carried by the younger generation. Hadi Zaher/Flickr

How Australian dystopian young adult fiction differs from its US counterparts

There are many similarities between blockbusting young adult novels such as The Hunger Games series and Australian books such as Taronga – but there are also clear differences in their messages for the young.
The standard of proof that applies in different types of judicial proceedings may result in quite different verdicts. Shutterstock/Andrey Popov

Judge suspects but must acquit man on child pornography charges

After saying he was 'deeply suspicious', a judge cleared a man of child pornography offences. We need to understand the standard of proof to make sense of verdicts, including AFL rulings on doping.
Cold and flu tablets won’t cure a cold. Flood G./Flickr

The low-down on ‘cold and flu’ tablets

Pharmacies have aisles full of cold and flu tablets. But which product is the best one for you? And will it really help you feel better?
Your pain is in fact produced in your head and it will produce it more readily and more intensely if you have what you think is clear evidence that something is wrong. Mislav Marohnić/Flickr

No brain, no pain: it is in the mind, so test results can make it worse

People develop a long-term problem after an episode of back pain if they expect to not recover. Steps by the medical sector to avoid catatrophising back pain by not suggesting scans will help.


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