University of Toronto

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto has one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in depth and breadth on any other Canadian campus.

With more than 75,000 students across three campuses (St. George, Mississauga and Scarborough) and over 450,000 alumni active in every region of the world, U of T’s influence is felt in every area of human endeavour.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 131 articles

In Blade Runner 2049, a holographic artificial intelligence character, “Joi,” is marketed as a personal companion to the protagonist, “K.” (Handout)

Blade Runner 2049 misses mark on artificial intelligence

Blade Runner 2049 misses modern strides in artificial intelligence, which is now capable of performing creative work alongside humans.
Bees living in cities often have to seek out green space like parks, ravines and gardens. Green roofs could offer them some habitat. (Shutterstock)

Bees in the city: Designing green roofs for pollinators

Urban bees deal with what's known as "habitat patches," discontinuous patches of green like gardens, parks and ravines. Green roofs could offer relief to bees dealing with habitat fragmentation.
Spanish National Police block people trying to reach a polling station in Barcelona, Spain, on Oct. 1. Catalan leaders accused Spanish police of brutality and repression. AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

The hypocrisy of the European Union on the Catalan referendum

The European Union is quick to condemn countries like Venezuela and Turkey when they engage in anti-democratic tactics. So why is it so silent on Spain's treatment of the Catalan?
In this1999 file photo, Playboy founder Hugh Hefner receives kisses from Playboy playmates during the 52nd Cannes Film Festival in France. Hefner has died at age 91. (AP Photo/Laurent Rebours)

Hugh Hefner’s legacy: Narrow visions of sex and beauty

With the recent death of Hugh Hefner, come questions about his impact on sexual culture: Did his empire broaden the sexual landscape or did it usher in a pitiful era of objectification of women?
Former astronaut Julie Payette urges Canada to use science, knowledge, and innovation as paths to better future for all, during her installation ceremony as Canada’s 29th Governor General in the Senate chamber of Parliament on Oct. 2. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld)

Co-operative research revolution could answer call to transform science and society

Society needs more research that is both excellent and useful. We can achieve this by shifting the academic culture toward research that is Highly Integrative Basic and Responsive (HIBAR).
When we sit, we accumulate calories and excess fat which can cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease and death. The solution may be as simple as counting. (Shutterstock)

How to stop sitting yourself to death

If you sit all day at work, then cancer, diabetes, heart disease and death are the likely outcomes. A cardiologist explains how the simple act of counting can reverse this evolutionary trend.
Cmdr. Michael Burnham (Sonequa Martin-Green) goes on a scientifically implausible spacewalk in Star Trek: Discovery. (Handout)

How ‘Star Trek: Discovery’ warps science

Star Trek Discovery is the latest offering in the 50-year-old science fiction franchise beloved by scientists — but it isn't about science.
A controversial article in a respected academic journal recently made the argument for colonialism. Here, a man is carried by Congolese men in a photo from the early 20th centiry.

Colonialism was a disaster and the facts prove it

An academic article that asserted the benefits of colonialism caused an outcry and resulted in calls for its removal. A post-colonial expert explains why.
Residential school survivor Lorna Standingready is comforted by a fellow survivor during the closing ceremony of the Indian Residential Schools Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

How I am learning to include Indigenous knowledge in the classroom

"What have we failed to know and at what cost?" An education professor draws upon Indigenous literature to support a personal journey into classroom decolonization.
Is that needle really necessary, doctor? A new list of recommendations by Canadian resident physicians suggests it might not be. (Shutterstock)

Five simple ways to improve Canadian health care

A recent study found that 30 per cent of Canadian health care is unnecessary. Here are five recommendations to avoid pointless health care -- for doctors and patients.
While office workers often worry they sit too long while on the job, research suggests standing at work increases the risk of heart disease. (Shutterstock)

Standing too much at work can double your risk of heart disease

Annoyed you don't have a sit-stand desk? Spare a thought for those workers who have to stand all day: Standing may double the risk of heart disease.
Jerry Natanine, community leader and former mayor of Clyde River, at a news conference in Ottawa in July following the Supreme Court of Canada ruling that upheld Inuit treaty rights in the Arctic. His lawyer and co-author Nader Hasan stands behind him. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Lessons from Supreme Court decisions on Indigenous consultation

The Supreme Court of Canada's recent decisions on Clyde River and Chippewas contain key lessons to ensure that Indigenous rights are recognized and respected in the future.
The Acros Fukuoka eco-building in Fukuoka, Japan boasts one of the world’s most famous green roofs. The GRIT Lab at the University of Toronto is working to bring green roofs to the city and beyond in order to combat climate change. (Shutterstock)

How green roofs can protect city streets from flooding

Green roofs could play a critical role in helping cities cope with extreme rainfall events in the age of climate change. The roofs essentially suck up stormwater like sponges if designed properly.
A total solar eclipse will be visible across parts of the United States Aug. 21, treating amateur and professional astronomers alike to sights similar to this NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory ultraviolet image of the moon eclipsing the sun on Jan. 31, 2014. (NASA)

How to safely watch an eclipse: Advice from an astronomer

If you've ever wondered why you can look at a solar eclipse and why it can harm your eyes, the answer is in the sun's rays.
People reject science such as that about climate change and vaccines, but readily believe scientists about solar eclipses, like this one reflected on the sunglasses of a man dangerously watching in Nicosia, Cyprus, in a 2015 file photo. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

Eclipse of reason: Why do people disbelieve scientists?

People universally believe scientists' solar eclipse calendars, but vaccine warnings or climate predictions are forms of science that strangely do not enjoy equivalent acceptance.
Former Globe and Mail newspaper reporter turned novelist Omar El Akkad contemplates his debut book American War in his publisher’s Toronto office in this 2017 file photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

Worth reading: Future visions of women, war, time and space

Astronomer Bryan Gaensler picks five speculative and science fiction novels worth reading, including Omar El Akkad's _American War_.
Ontarians got a taste of privatization in the 1990s, when the Conservative government of Mike Harris handed over the lucrative Highway 407 toll road in a 99-year lease for a fraction of its value.

Financiers are now controlling public works, much to the public’s confusion

Canadian governments aren't completely selling off major public works, but their embrace of public-private "partnerships" is giving private financiers control of major infrastructure projects.

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