University of Toronto

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto has one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in depth and breadth on any other Canadian campus.

With more than 75,000 students across three campuses (St. George, Mississauga and Scarborough) and over 450,000 alumni active in every region of the world, U of T’s influence is felt in every area of human endeavour.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 117 articles

A total solar eclipse will be visible across parts of the United States Aug. 21, treating amateur and professional astronomers alike to sights similar to this NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory ultraviolet image of the moon eclipsing the sun on Jan. 31, 2014. (NASA)

How to safely watch an eclipse: Advice from an astronomer

If you've ever wondered why you can look at a solar eclipse and why it can harm your eyes, the answer is in the sun's rays.
People reject science such as that about climate change and vaccines, but readily believe scientists about solar eclipses, like this one reflected on the sunglasses of a man dangerously watching in Nicosia, Cyprus, in a 2015 file photo. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

Eclipse of reason: Why do people disbelieve scientists?

People universally believe scientists' solar eclipse calendars, but vaccine warnings or climate predictions are forms of science that strangely do not enjoy equivalent acceptance.
Former Globe and Mail newspaper reporter turned novelist Omar El Akkad contemplates his debut book American War in his publisher’s Toronto office in this 2017 file photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

Worth reading: Future visions of women, war, time and space

Astronomer Bryan Gaensler picks five speculative and science fiction novels worth reading, including Omar El Akkad's _American War_.
Ontarians got a taste of privatization in the 1990s, when the Conservative government of Mike Harris handed over the lucrative Highway 407 toll road in a 99-year lease for a fraction of its value.

Financiers are now controlling public works, much to the public’s confusion

Canadian governments aren't completely selling off major public works, but their embrace of public-private "partnerships" is giving private financiers control of major infrastructure projects.
(Shutterstock)

Five amazing books to read this summer

When picking books to read this summer, reach out for the unknown. Here are five expert recommendations for fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, for which deserved attention is just starting to shine.
Children who witness crime are more vulnerable to error than adults when identifying the perpetrator. (Shutterstock)

Helping child witnesses: A new design for police lineups

Child eyewitnesses make more mistakes than adults when identifying criminals. A new police lineup design could help us assess their reliability and prevent wrongful convictions.
Violent and distressing news video and images such as this girl fleeing fighting in Mosul, Iraq, on July 2, pose mental health risks for journalists in newsrooms — a new phenomenon. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Violent news: Psychological trauma a new risk in digital age

Journalists face psychological trauma from producing news even when they are distant from the scene of violent incidents. What can news organizations do?
There’s an urgent need for a new ethic of dementia care that supports the facilitation of sexual expression. (Shutterstock)

A new way to think about dementia and sex

The sexuality of persons living with dementia is demonized by media and ignored by clinical guidelines. But sexuality is fundamental to being human and vital to a humane culture of residential care.
The future of citizenship is more distributed, interactive and local than dealing with central government through new technology. That may be sad news for those who wish to interact with the likes of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in virtual reality if not in person. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz)

Canada in 150 years: People power will shake up society

The disruptive impact of intelligent machines and new social movements will force us to remake citizenship into a more personal pursuit over the next 150 years.
Blockorama celebrated its 19th year this Pride; a hard won right to celebrate. (GerardRichardson.com)

Right to party: 20 years of Black Queer love and resilience

One of the lesser known demands of Black Lives Matter is the right to a safe space to celebrate Black Queer Lives. This year's Blockorama party in Toronto is evidence the movement is progressing.
Canada in 2167 could see genetically engineered humans living alongside sentient machines in cities radically altered by ecological change. (Shutterstock)

Humans in 2167: Internet implants and no sleep

By 2167, genetically designed, digitally enhanced humans with Internet-connected brains will live with intelligent machines in a transformed environment and maybe even among the stars.
William Shatner as Star Trek’s Captain James T. Kirk is depicted on a commemorative stamp issued by Canada Post in 2016. Handout/Canada Post

Energy fuels Star Trek economy

Canada's economy faces a radical shift as abundant energy and resources could propel the country toward a Star Trek future.

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