Articles on CITES

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The Parties to CITES (CoP17), rejected a proposal from nine African nations to upgrade the status of lions. Shutterstock

Lions are better protected, but loopholes mean threats remain

A stronger ban on lion trade by CITES would have helped to lessen some of the threats lions face but it would have not have protected the animals from sport hunting.
Women demonstrate in Kenya’s Great Rift Valley against the export of wild animals from the Maasai Mara National Park. Reuters/Antony Gitonga

Conservation decisions must protect the livelihoods of people living in Africa

In the absence of trading ivory, other solutions have to be found to fund conservation and support communities living on the front line of the battle against poaching.
The fate of elephants ultimately lies in the hands of humans and a continued ban will not solve the poaching problem. Shutterstock

The ban on ivory sales has been an abject failure. A rethink is needed

The ivory trade is a very contentious issue and will be debated at CITES. It will revolve around maintaining or lifting the ban on trade. But the human element is likely to be ignored.
CITES has become the premier multilateral arrangement to tackle illegal wildlife trafficking. Ross Harvey

Explainer: what is CITES and why should we care?

The focus of CITES is not solely on the protection of species. It also promotes controlled trade that is not detrimental to the sustainability of wild species.
Dehorning is practised on many South African private reserves and is seen as a way of deterring poachers. Keith Somerville

Dehorning rhinos: why there may be a case for doing it

A few national parks and reserves want to dehorn rhinos and there is a lobby for a regulated and closely monitored legal trade in rhino horn. But this is met by opposition from many.
Kenya burned 105 tonnes of ivory confiscated from smugglers and poachers, an action denounced by Bostwana as wrong and wasteful. Reuters/Siegfried Modola

EU’s new stand on ivory trade upsets East Africa ahead of key decision

EU officials argue that while the ban on ivory trade is right for some countries, it shouldn't be all-encompassing. It has called on African range states to reach agreement on the issue.

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