Articles on Latin American politics

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Some 200,000 Argentinean women marched on March 8 for International Women’s Day. Many proclaimed their support for legalizing abortion. AP Photo/Tomas F. Cuesta

Argentina’s abortion legalization debate ignites soul searching on women’s rights

A new bill that would legalize abortion in Argentina has spurred surprise debate on the gender pay gap, parental leave and political representation. Will Argentinean women finally get their due?
Bolivia’s Evo Morales and Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro are both classic Latin American strongmen. But that’s where the similarities end. David Mercado/Reuters

Bolivia is not Venezuela – even if its president does want to stay in power forever

Bolivia's populist leader has been in office for 12 years. He's a thorn in the US's side and an ally of the late Hugo Chávez. Now he's running for a fourth term. But that doesn't make him a dictator.
Adios Raúl, hola Miguel. smael Francisco/Courtesy of Cubadebate/Handout via Reuters

Cuba’s getting a new president

Miguel Díaz-Canel, a 57-year-old engineer and Communist Party loyalist, is expected to succeed Raúl Castro as president of Cuba. Will change bring prosperity or instability to the Cuban people?
The Venezuelans now rushing across the border to seek refuge in Brazil join millions of Brazilian migrants who’ve been displaced within their own country. Nacho Doce/Reuters

Venezuelan refugees inflame Brazil’s already simmering migrant crisis

Since 2000, 8.8 million Brazilians have been displaced by disaster, development and crime, new data shows. Now Venezuelan migrants are pouring into the country. Still, Brazil has no real refugee plan.
Mexico’s new app makes it a snap for political independents to collect voter signatures — unless, of course, their supporters don’t have smartphones or live in rural areas without reliable internet. Reuters

Want to be president of Mexico? There’s an app for that

Almost 50 independents want to run for president of Mexico in 2018. But only a handful will likely make the ballot, in part due to the glitchy election app voters must use to show their support.
Venezuela’s crisis has been terrible for years. But if President Maduro is re-elected, things could actually get worse. Marco Bello/Reuters

Why an election won’t topple Venezuela’s Maduro

The Venezuelan government has just announced that it will hold a presidential election by the end of April. Despite pervasive hunger and discontent, democracy still doesn't stand a chance.
Intersectionality in action: Brazilian women are organizing across class and race lines to decry inequality in a country that remains deeply ‘machista.’ Naco Doce/Reuters

Beyond #MeToo, Brazilian women rise up against racism and sexism

Before #MeToo, Brazilian women launched #MyFirstHarrassment and marched for racial equality. Today, this feminist resurgence is tackling health care, plastic surgery, violence and more.
Donald Trump says cheap Mexican labor is hurting American workers. But isn’t it also hurting Mexican workers? AP Photo/Guillermo Arias

How Trump’s NAFTA renegotiations could help Mexican workers

Trump has attacked NAFTA, saying that cheap, under-regulated Mexican labor hurts American workers. If he's right, then NAFTA negotiations could be a chance to push Mexico on workers' rights.
Voter turnout was under 50 percent in Venezuela’s Dec. 10 mayor elections, which were boycotted by most opposition parties. Reuters

Venezuelan regime sweeps mayors races, tightening Maduro’s grip on power

Venezuela’s ruling Socialist Party won 39 of 40 major mayoral races on Dec. 10. A victorious President Nicolás Maduro is now likely to call a snap presidential election early next year. Can he win?
Violence erupted across Honduras as the country responded to a presidential election that’s too close to call. No matter who wins, the bloodshed is likely to continue. AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Honduras’s election crisis is likely to end in violence

Nearly two weeks after its election, Honduras still does not have a president. Clashes across the country have killed a dozen protesters, and police are now refusing to enforce a national curfew.
Colombians look on as House of Representatives prepares to vote on transitional justice framework after 10 months of delays. Jaime Saldarriaga/Retuers

The latest threat to peace in Colombia: Congress

Conservative congressional reps in Colombia have been stalling votes on key parts of the country's peace accords through endless petitions and nonstop debate. In short, they're filibustering.
Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto’s administration has been plagued by corruption and scandal, and many voters have finally had enough. Edgard Garrido/Reuters

As angry voters reject major parties, Mexico’s 2018 presidential race grows chaotic

Mexico's 2018 presidential race hasn't even begun, but it's already a nail-biter, featuring two women, a left-wing firebrand, party defections, strange bedfellows and no small dose of scandal.
For six months, the Venezuelan opposition staged daily protests against the Maduro regime. Then they decided to take their fight to the polls. Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

Venezuela’s opposition is on the verge of collapse

After the Maduro regime won Venezuela's recent gubernatorial elections, results are contested, people are desperate and the opposition has fractured. Can the resistance survive this setback?

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