Articles on Critical Race

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Detail from Mickalene Thomas’s ‘Le Dejeuner sur l’herbe: Les trois femmes noires’ which is part of a show called ‘Femmes Noires’ currently at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann Collection © Mickalene Thomas

Black Canadian women artists detangle the roots of Black beauty

A recent and powerful exhibit by New York artist Mickalene Thomas at the Art Gallery of Ontario has opened the door for some deep discussions about Black Canadian women and visual representation.
Treaty 4, which covered present-day southern Saskatchewan and a small part of western Manitoba was negotiated and signed at Qu'appelle Lakes. Here Saulteux from Upper Assiniboine River, Oct. 16, 1887 were promised for every ‘man, woman and child $1,200 …blankets and other articles.’ (Library and Archives Canada/Natural Resources Canada fonds/PA-050799).

Historical lawsuit affirms Indigenous laws on par with Canada’s

A recent historical win for Ontario First Nations against the government of Canada is as significant for the legal process, which took into account Anishinaabe law, as it is for the win itself.
Indigenous women’s activism in Canada has a long history. The organizing work of Isabelle McNab, first president of the Saskatchewan Women’s Indian Association, can be seen as the precursor to later activism like this First Nations Idle No More protest for better treatment of Indigenous peoples at the Douglas-Peace Arch near Surrey, B.C., on Jan. 5, 2013. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Hidden from history: Indigenous women’s activism in Saskatchewan

Built on historical research, this article tells the resilient, fascinating and rarely told history of Indigenous women's organizing and resistance in Saskatchewan.
Critics and audiences of the Oscar-nominated film Roma may be missing important Mexican historical and cultural facts.

The Oscars: what you may have missed in ‘Roma’

Director Alfonso Cuarón's 'Roma' has received 10 Oscar nominations. Here, a sociologist explains the hidden historical and cultural context of the film.
In the 19th century, white families in the U.S. could easily acquire real estate. This was never the case for Black Americans. U.S. National Archives

The myth of the American Frontier still shapes U.S. racial divides

Old 19th-century agreements between the U.S. government which expelled Indigenous peoples from their land and gave it cheaply to white settlers continue to impact inequalities in the United States.
This photo from May 2018 shows Cyntoia Brown at her clemency hearing at the Tennessee Prison for Women in Nashville, Tenn. On Jan. 7, 2019, Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam granted executive clemency to Brown, serving a life sentence for a murder that happened after she was forced into sex work. (Lacy Atkins /The Tennessean via AP, Pool, File)

Clemency for Cyntoia Brown was long overdue

Cyntoia Brown has been granted clemency for killing a man when she was a teenager and forced into the sex trade. The case showed why the justice system must stop punishing women for defending themselves.
Canadians seem not to want to talk about race and racism, deferring instead to ‘income’ and immigration status when it comes to measuring education success. LeonardoBurgos /Unsplash

Why won’t Canada collect data on race and student success?

News of Canada's successful immigrant students glosses over important stories of racism, for example the 'streaming' of Black males. But without more data beyond Toronto, the story is hard to share.
Indigenous youth planning on attending post-secondary education would benefit from appropriate financial literacy information. Here students Cheyenne Wilson, 13, Roy Joseph, 13, centre, and Connor Roberts, 13, after attending a presentation by B.C.‘s representative for Children and Youth at Shoreline Community School in Victoria, B.C., on May 15, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Financial empowerment is the road to success for Indigenous youth

Indigenous entrepreneurship is growing at a rate six times faster than the general Canadian population and it is 10 years younger. Culturally relevant financial literacy is critical to its success.
The fact that parents may be physically absent from schools does not mean they are disinterested in their children’s academic and professional success. Muhammad Rizwan/Unsplash

Too busy for the PTA, but working-class parents care

Working class parents may be too busy to attend high school events, but they take an active role in their children's success.
Despite the demonization of marginalized communities by politicians on the campaign trail, research shows they’re marked by a profound sense of community, supportive social networks – and resilience. A Toronto Regent Park resident, a boy named Cody, is seen as part of an art installation in this 2008 photo. Dan Bergeron/fauxreel.ca

Campaign trail bigots blind to the strengths of marginalized communities

Research shows marginalized communities are marked by a profound sense of community, supportive social networks -- and resilience.
Megyn Kelly appears on the set of her show, ‘Megyn Kelly Today’ at NBC Studios in New York on September 21, 2017. Kelly questioned why dressing up in blackface is wrong. Kelly now says she understands that she needs to be more sensitive. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Invision - Charles Sykes

If you’re thinking of doing blackface for Halloween, just don’t

Many claim the offensive part about blackface is from a long time ago and claim blackface costumes, especially at Halloween, are innocent fun. What could be the harm?
The new cannabis legislation in Canada does not give enough thought to those who were overly punished for cannabis-related activities. Jakob Owens/Unsplash

As cannabis is legalized, let’s remember amnesty

Now that cannabis is almost legal in Canada, many are celebrating. Before we forget, we should remember those that have been arrested for previous crimes and push for amnesty.
Concrete action steps are needed to help reconciliation, says a research team that offers 12 actionable ideas. Here Ben Paul, of the Musqueam First Nation, sings and plays a drum during the Walk for Reconciliation in Vancouver, B.C., on Sept. 24, 2017, held to promote positive relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

New guide kick-starts reconciliation in the justice system

It's been three years since the TRC released its report on the lasting impact of residential schools in Canada but responses to the 94 Calls to Action have been slow. A new framework hopes to change that.
Barbershop Talks creates a place for Black men and boys to meet and discuss ideas about masculinity. Edgar Chaparro/Unsplash

Barbershop Talks: A safe place to discuss Black masculinity

Barbershop Talks use the idea of the "barbershop around the corner" as a place to meet and discuss ideas and create a safe space for Black men and boys to talk openly about masculinity.
United States’ Simone Manuel who won the Olympic gold medal for the U.S. in the 100-meter freestyle at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, said she hopes for a day when there are more Black swimmers. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Swimming while Black

Summer time and time to cool off in a pool or lake? The statistics reveal that race complicates the issue: in the U.S., Black people drown at five times the rate of white people.
Actors Laura Harrier and John David Washington humorously and believably drive home the film’s strong racial irony.

‘BlacKkKlansman’ – a deadly serious comedy

BlacKkKlansman is more than a good story: it expertly weaves together comedy with serious drama to bring the story of past racism to illuminate our present day issues.
Small business owners provide a service by offering goods not found elsewhere and employing local community members. Here, a sari shop window in Toronto’s ‘India Bazaar.’ Ian Muttoo/https://www.flickr.com/photos/imuttoo/

Why immigrant Mom & Pop Shops are really social ventures

We may celebrate the contributions of newcomers of the past; however, we make the integration process difficult. Some immigrants turn to business to fill the gaps for themselves and their community.
Sandra Oh, a U.S./Canadian actress of Korean descent, is an outspoken advocate for greater representation in film and television. She is the first woman of Asian decent to be nominated for an Emmy. Here, just before being inducted into Canada’s Walk of Fame in Toronto, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Aaron Vincent Elkaim

Thank you, Sandra Oh – a first for the Emmys

Sandra Oh's recent Emmy nomination for 'Killing Eve' is a sign of appreciation of her work but also a symbol of hope for the author as a former actor and as an academic.

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