Articles on History

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The rebellious French generals Edmond Jouhaud, Raoul Salan, and Maurice Challe (from left to right) leave the General Delegation in April 23, 1961 in Algiers, after taking power (with General Zeller) to oppose the Algerian policy of General de Gaulle. The Public Salvation Committee intended to preserve French Algeria was formed on 13 May 1958 with General Massu as its president. AFP

‘I understood you!’: May 1958, the return of De Gaulle and the fall of France’s Fourth Republic

In May 1958 General de Gaulle returned to power and established the Fifth Republic. Yet despite the monumental changes of that time, many in France today still don’t understand what really happened.
‘The Block’ in Redfern has been a site of struggle and activism for Indigenous inclusion in planning processes. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Indigenous communities are reworking urban planning, but planners need to accept their history

While planning policies and practices have contributed to marginalising Indigenous people, planners can now work with them to ensure they have their rightful say in shaping Australian communities.
Battle of St. Eustache, December 14,1837: Rear view of St. Eustache church and scattering of insurgents during the 1837 rebellion in Saint-Eustache, a city in Québec. Ink and watercolor on paper. Lord Charles Beauclerk/Library Archives of Canada

Montreal’s mysterious monument: Whose past do we commemorate?

Why is a memorial to 29 Francophone men who were executed by the British government as well as to 58 men who were exiled to Australia in 1838 hidden away in a Montreal cemetery?
French President Emmanuel Macro arrives at the Tallinn Digital Summit, September 28, 2017. Aron Urb/EU2017EE Estonian Presidency

Emmanuel Macron: president of the ‘liquid’ society

Since his election, Emmanuel Macron has emerged as a man of the "liquid" society, where finance, labour, politics and people shift and flow. What matters is change, not the direction one is taking.
A homeless man sleeps on a tram shelter bench on Batman Avenue, Melbourne, 1990s. William Bowers/Museums Victoria

Melbourne’s ‘doughnut city’ housed its homeless

When the city centre was revitalised in the 1990s, homeless people were pushed out. With homelessness rising today, it's important to recognise the links between urban development and displacement.
Tabletop games have been around for more than a century. Early North American game makers often depicted Indigenous people as savage enemies.

The hidden history of Indigenous stereotypes in tabletop games

For more than a century, board games have provided children with some of their first exposure to Indigenous stereotypes — hidden behind ornate lithographs, painted cubes and punched cardboard.
Circe and Her Swine: Character sketches of romance, fiction and the drama, 1892 , New York, E. Hess. Ebenezer Cobham Brewer/University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries

#BalanceTonPorc: the story behind pigs and lust

France's answer to #MeToo was #BalanceTonPorc -- "denounce your pig". An analysis of the idioms linking to sex and pigs provides some insights into why the hashtag hit home.
The “Burney Relief,” which is believed to represent either Ishtar, the Mesopotamian goddess of love and war, or her older sister Ereshkigal, Queen of the underworld (c. 19th or 18th century BC) BabelStone

In ancient Mesopotamia, sex among the gods shook heaven and earth

Sex was central to life in ancient Mesopotamia. And the authors of Sumerian love poetry, depicting the exploits of divine couples, showed a wealth of practical knowledge about the stages of female sexual arousal.

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