Displaying 1 - 20 of 93 articles

Does listening to certain songs help us slip into the ether? 'Clouds' via

Can listening to music help you sleep?

Composer Max Richter – with his epic, eight-hour-long piece Sleep – aims to be an auditory sandman.
Not dark enough. People in bed via

Are we sleep-deprived or just darkness-deprived?

Is electricity making us sleep less? A new study on sleep in preindustrial societies suggests the answer is no. But it misses a big point: people in preindustrial societies spend more time in darkness than we do.
Catch those z’s. Tilo G/Shutterstock

Why everyone should embrace their inner sloth

The clocks going back hold the tantalising promise of an extra hour in bed. But the modern attitude towards that champion of indolence, the sloth, shows that sloth is still very much a deadly sin.
We now have the technology to do track our sleep through the night, but that may be doing more harm than good. Marisa/Flickr

Health Check: is your sleep app keeping you up at night?

Tracking sleep is now routine in monitoring overall well-being. But are the devices used to do this actually useful, or have we simply found a more sophisticated way to clock watch?
Popular characters such as Sleeping Beauty illustrate our enduring interest in tales of people who sleep continuously or cannot stay awake. Sofi/flickr

The big sleep: science is waking up to the curious story of narcolepsy

Perhaps because we all need sleep, we have an enduring interest in sleep disorders such as narcolepsy, which causes a constant irrepressible need for sleep.
The activities we do during the day – from having a fight with a partner to using our iPhones at night – also affect our hormone levels and, in turn, our quality of sleep. Jan Faukner/Shutterstock

Chemical messengers: how hormones help us sleep

Sleep allows many of our hormones to replenish so we have the optimal energy, immunity, appetite and coping ability to face the day’s highs and lows.
Limiting screen time before bedtime is beneficial for sleep. shutterstock

Why screen time before bed is bad for children

Screen time – by way of watching television or using computers, mobile phones and other electronic mobile devices – may be having a large and negative impact on children’s sleep.
You can do a lot while you sleep. Woman via

Can we unlearn social biases while we sleep?

We strengthen memories while we sleep, and researchers have found a way to cue that process to help people better retain information that counters implicit biases.

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