Articles on Sleep deprivation

Displaying 1 - 20 of 25 articles

Staying alert and safe on the night shift not only affects workers’ health, but the health and safety of the people around them. from www.shutterstock.com

Power naps and meals don’t always help shift workers make it through the night

Taking a power nap on a night shift can leave you feeling groggy. And eating a large meal can reduce your alertness. So, what's a tired shift worker to do to make it through the night?
Their hormones mean they still need zzz’s even when they’re already supposed to be in homeroom. Antonio Guillem/Shutterstock.com

Sleepy teenage brains need school to start later in the morning

Teenagers aren't just lazy. Their sleep hormones aren't calibrated to let them get up and go until later in the morning – which has academic and health consequences when school starts too early.
Donald Trump pretending to sleep. The Republican candidate says four hours is enough sleep for him. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

Even presidential candidates need sleep

Sleep is essential for good executive functioning and for good general health. So how do candidates keep up the grueling demands of their schedules?
Innocence puts you at risk in an interrogation room. Interrogation image via www.shutterstock.com.

Feeling sleepy? You might be at risk of falsely confessing to a crime you did not commit

Innocent people do confess to terrible crimes they had nothing to do with. Psychologists are investigating factors that contribute to false confession – including how well-rested a suspect feels.
Not dark enough. People in bed via www.shutterstock.com.

Are we sleep-deprived or just darkness-deprived?

Is electricity making us sleep less? A new study on sleep in preindustrial societies suggests the answer is no. But it misses a big point: people in preindustrial societies spend more time in darkness than we do.
Light from electronic devices can alter the quality of sleep our quality. Alexander Rentsch/Flickr

Booting up or powering down: how e-readers affect your sleep

While many of these devices, especially e-readers, seem harmless enough, the light they emit may affect our sleep patterns and leave us feeling tired the next day.
Time spent checking the clock when you can’t sleep may be feeding your insomnia. bark/Flickr

Explainer: what is insomnia and what can you do about it?

We all have a poor night’s sleep from time to time: those nights when you lie awake for hours trying desperately to go to sleep but can’t stop worrying about tomorrow. Or when you repeatedly wake up throughout…
The best way to keep your hand off the snooze button is to have a regular sleep schedule every day of the week. Bethan/Flickr

Morning haze: why it’s time to stop hitting the snooze button

It’s 6.30am and after a long holiday break, your alarm clock is insistently telling you it’s time to get out of bed. For many people – me included – the automatic reaction is to hit the snooze button…
Babies can learn to self settle through controlled crying. Yoshihide Nomura/Flickr

Controlled crying is helpful, not harmful

Every evening, parents across Australia hope their babies will sleep through the night. Many won’t. That’s where controlled comforting, or controlled crying might help. Contrary to some claims, this is…
There are effective non-drug options for treating insomnia. Alyssa L. Miller

Some reasons why you should avoid sleeping pills

We’ve known for a long time that hypnotic drugs are not good to take for more than one to three weeks because they are habit-forming and increase the risk of accidents. And there’s now a growing body of…

Top contributors

More