Articles on Storytelling

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Man Out of Time is an affecting portrait of a family rocked by the patriarchal figure’s long-term depression. shutterstock

Inside the story: Man Out of Time and the inheritance of suffering

Stephanie Bishop's latest novel demonstrates a sophisticated approach to the relationship between time and narrative: novelists and aspiring writers would do well to look closely at her achievement.
An illustration of Palorchestes azael, a marsupial tapir from the Pleistocene of Australia. There is evidence that this extinct species is depicted in rock art from the Kimberley. Nobu Tamura/Wikimedia Commons

Of bunyips and other beasts: living memories of long-extinct creatures in art and stories

It is plausible to suppose that human memories of long-extinct creatures today underpin many stories we have generally regarded as fiction.
Barry Jenkins’ ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ has been nominated for best adapted screenplay at the 91st Academy Awards. Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

Oscars 2019: Beyond the stats, why diversity matters

Numbers alone don't relay the importance of people seeing their own experiences and lives mirrored in popular culture.
Bahareh Jahandoost brings literature, performing arts and new media together to express Iranian society. Mehdi Khosravi

Traditional storytelling meets new media activism in Iran

A Canada-Iran collaboration uses performance art, storytelling and new media to confront the troubles of global migration and borders.
The technology and rapid pace of critical care in hospital can often erase the patient experience. Opportunities for patient storytelling can transform health care. (Shutterstock)

How patient stories can improve intensive care

When patients, doctors and nurses have the opportunity to share their experiences of hospital intensive care, the resulting dialogue can be transformative.
Members of the James Bay Cree gather around the fire as part of a week-long celebration called ‘wellness week,’ aimed at improving personal health and wellness in their community in northern Québec. (David DyckFehderau)

Indigenous group tackles diabetes with storytelling

Like many Indigenous groups around the world, the James Bay Cree of northern Québec have a disproportionately high rate of diabetes. They’re facing it down with a decidedly Indigenous solution.
Edmund Dulac’s 1910 illustration of Sleeping Beauty. Wikimedia images

Friday essay: why grown-ups still need fairy tales

Fairy tales can be brutal, violent, sexual and laden with taboo. But they are are excellent narratives with which to think through a range of human experiences: from disappointment, and fear to envy and grief.

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