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Articles on Infectious diseases

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While ivermectin was originally used to treat river blindness, it has also been repurposed to treat other human parasitic infections. ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP via Getty Images

Ivermectin is a Nobel Prize-winning wonder drug – but not for COVID-19

Ivermectin has been a lifesaving drug for people with parasitic infections like river blindness and strongyloidiasis. But taking it for COVID-19 may result in the opposite effect.
A bad flu year on top of the pandemic could mean trouble for already-stressed hospitals. George Clerk/E+ Collection via Getty Images

Flu season paired with COVID-19 presents the threat of a ‘twindemic,’ making the need for vaccination all the more urgent

Recent computer modeling shows the upcoming flu season might see a surge in cases. Coupled with COVID-19’s continued threat, doctors are again urging Americans to get their shots.
The huge number of active coronavirus infections offers plenty of opportunity for mutations to occur and new variants to arise. Eoneren/E+ via Getty Images

Massive numbers of new COVID–19 infections, not vaccines, are the main driver of new coronavirus variants

When the coronavirus copies itself, there is a chance its RNA will mutate. But new variants must jump from one host to another, and the more infections there are, the better chance this will happen.
While prison may isolate people from the larger community, it does not isolate them from COVID-19. Scott Olson/Staff/Getty Images News

Correctional officers are driving the pandemic in prisons

New research shows correctional officers are vectors of infection, driving COVID-19 rates both inside prisons and in their communities.
People suffering from long-term effects of COVID-19 face uncertainty about the nature of their symptoms and how long they might last. Halfpoint Images/Moment via Getty Images

Deciphering the symptoms of long COVID-19 is slow and painstaking – for both sufferers and their physicians

Researchers are piecing together clues to better understand the puzzling array of symptoms in those who never seem to fully recover from COVID-19.
Security precautions, thoughtful facilities design, careful training and safe lab practices help keep pathogens isolated. Boston University Photography

We work with dangerous pathogens in a downtown Boston biocontainment lab – here’s why you can feel safe about our research

The microbiologist who directs the National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories at Boston University explains all the biosafety precautions in place that help him feel safer in the lab than out.

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